January 2011

My mouth is watering as I plan for an early spring run1

This part of the year, trapped indoors by bad weather, always gets me to musing on better times — like last spring, when there was no better time in memory for getting the blues. I’m talking about Chesapeake Bay blue crabs of course, not the mournful variety.  I had steeled myself in 2010 not to expect anything happening crabwise until maybe mid-June, and perhaps not much even then. So I was astounded when a friend keyed me in to a red-hot run starting in mid-May. 

Calvert Cliffs’ Miocene marine deposits are the largest in the world. But why?

I am going to test your patience and write about geology. This means you will be tempted to immediately turn to the News of the Weird. Please don’t. Memorize the following sentence; it is your five-second speech on what makes Calvert County special: Calvert Cliffs contain the largest exposed Miocene marine deposits in the world. That, and a geological mystery.

Come for a love story, stay for an emotional evisceration

Blue Valentine isn’t a romantic drama; it’s a horror movie for romantics. Derek Cianfrance’s (Cagefighter) film asks questions that most modern romantic movies attempt to avoid: What happens to a married couple when they fall out of love? What if you’re not meant to be with the person you married? The answers to these questions are often painful, messy and uncomfortable.

Use the ash from your fires to help your garden grow

Wood ash is a great source of calcium and potassium, also providing some phosphorus and lots of essential trace elements. A 12-quart pail full of fine wood ash can be spread over at least 100 square feet of garden soil. Make certain that the ash is cool before spreading, especially if the soil is covered with dry leaves.

Bay Weekly loves a success story — no matter how small — especially if it’s yours

How are your resolutions coming? Are you on the road to being healthier, wealthier and wiser in 2011? We’re talking about sustainability in the human sense here. Our own sustainability. It’s not only the Bay we need to sustain in health and productivity. Small as each of us humans is, we count too in the big picture of Earth’s sensitively calibrated and mysteriously linked ecosystems. So we’re included in Bay Weekly’s theme of sustainable living.
Dear Bay Weekly: I enjoyed reading Diana Beechener’s article, What’s With It: Finding the Source of a Local River, in the recent Bay Weekly of January 13. As a county resident who lives close to the Magothy, I never knew the meaning of the word until now. Also, in my role as editor of the Lake Waterford Community Association newsletter, I would like permission to reprint the article in our next edition. We have run several articles about the history of the Pasadena area over the past year, and your article would be of interest to our members.
Dear Bay Weekly:

Colonial Players offers a lyrical vignette on sources of
strength and faith that lie hidden from sight.

Through methods that seem illogical and almost mystical, diviners or dowsers seek sources of water that lie hidden from sight or scrutiny. The Diviners now playing at Colonial Players of Annapolis uses this metaphor to offer a lyrical vignette on sources of strength and faith that lie hidden from sight but whose power is undeniable.

Two Colonial Players shift stage to teach medics to treat you right

It’s a classic case of depression. The patient can’t sleep. She’s losing weight, she fidgets, feels guilty and is withdrawn since her partner’s fatal accident. Finally she sobs out her woes to the psychiatric nurse practitioner, who listens attentively to her story. “It’s not you fault,” the nurse assures his patient, Dianne Hood. She’s doing the right thing in coming for help, and he understands what she’s going through.

A B-movie with an A-List cast earns a failing grade

A priest, some crusaders and a witch wander into the woods. Turns out the joke is on whoever pays to see the movie. An overwrought, overstuffed tale of medieval mysticism, Season of the Witch fails on every possible level, from storytelling to acting to star Nicolas Cage’s improbable hairpiece.