June 2012

One good story deserves another

Heather Boughey began our Father’s Day feature with her legendary tale of what her late  father, our beloved columnist Bill Burton, left behind. Magnetically, her story attracted a half dozen others. Read on for the legacies bequeathed another icon, Bernie Fowler; a politician, Mike Miller; a riverkeeper, Fred Tutman; a mourning adult daughter, Donna Ware; a fledgling fourth generation journalist, Bay Weekly intern Jesse Furgurson; and a foster child of beloved relatives, Marjorie Johnson.

Two hundred years ago, a fledgling, not-so United States had to again take up arms against Great Britain.

The Chesapeake Bay played a starring role in the conflict that produced our national anthem. Francis Scott Key wrote The Star Spangled Banner as the city of Baltimore was under attack by a vast enemy fleet and army that had just destroyed the new capital, Washington City.     1812 was a long time ago. High tech was represented by small, wooden sailing vessels, powered by wind and sweat, technology little changed in hundreds of years. You want to talk to Europe? Could take months.

Be relentless and constant, Bernie Fowler counsels

Forty-two years in, and your life’s work earns an F.     That’s how long it’s been since Bernie Fowler took on the establishment to stand up for the Patuxent River, suing the state of Maryland and the federal government to “do what they ought to be doing: put a plan together to upgrade our river.”     You and I might find that grade on the NOAA-University of Maryland 2011 report card discouraging. Not Bernie Fowler. He’s in for the long haul.

Corvettes on the Bay presents 60 years of iconic history

Elaine Phillips was always interested in cars. When she married a man with a ’59 Corvette C1 he’d personally restored, her interest became an obsession. Now they have three, the ’59 C1, a ’61 C1, and an ’05 Coup, and she edits the Fiberglass Flyer, the newsletter of Corvette Annapolis.

That’s where the action is; that’s where you’ll see the sights

What did you inherit from your father?         Our Father’s Day question makes a readable story, as you’ll find. Can you resist answering it yourself? Digging, for better or worse, into the roots from which you’ve grown?     When I went digging, I heard my father ask me What’s cooking on Duval Street?

New regional recommendations help ensure legal harvests

It’s good news for the Chesapeake Bay, which provides 75 percent of striped bass stocks that reside in the Atlantic. New recommendations by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission tackle the very real threat that commercial poaching poses to the fish’s sustainability.

It takes two species for fruit trees to blossom

A Bay Weekly reader complains that her apple trees have not produced any fruit during the five years that she has had them in her garden. All five, she told me, are of the same variety: golden delicious trees. She was told that for the trees to produce fruit, she needed to plant more than one tree. Since her preference was for Golden Delicious, that is what she purchased and planted.

Look for the moon’s shadowy face on these shortest nights

The waning crescent moon heralds the coming sun in pre-dawn eastern skies through week’s end. So close to the sun’s glow, there’s more to this moon than meets the eye. While the crescent appears clearly aglow, the supposedly missing face appears as a dark notch. This is a result of earthshine, sunlight reflected off our planet that casts a shadowy glow over the rest of the moon’s visible face.

Colonial Players explores what It took to make Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell’s publishing blockbuster Gone with the Wind became an iconic American film, but first a screenplay had to be written. Playwright Ron Hutchinson whimsically, hysterically and sometimes seriously turned the Hollywood lore of the scriptwriting into Moonlight and Magnolias, now playing at Colonial Players of Annapolis.

You’ll come away humming all the standard hits and ready to rent the classic film

Fiddler on the Roof, Broadway and Hollywood’s golden chestnut, is rich as rugelach, oozing joy and pathos. The tale of a Jewish village in Revolutionary Russia was destined for success in the hands of 2nd Star Productions, a troupe with a track record of musical triumphs. But Oy! God is not always so quick to grant his blessings. Such an ambitious enterprise demands more chutzpah from its 39 chosen people than was evident on opening night.