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March 2013

Follow the Underground Railroad

Follow a trail of clues to learn how runaway slaves depended on nature and secret signals to ride the Underground Railroad. Friday-Sunday March 22-24, 10-4pm: free; trail guides $1. Chesapeake Children’s Museum, 25 Silopanna Rd., Annapolis: 410-990-1993; www.theccm.org  

Taste Maryland Beers and Wines

Taste Maryland wine and trace its illumination of state history, symbols and more. Special Maryland Day discounts on all in-stock Maryland wine. 2-5pm: free; 21 and older: Mills Fine Wine & Spirits, 87 Main Street, Annapolis: 410-263-2888; www.millswine.com

Taste Maryland Beers and Wines

Taste Maryland beers and learn a bit about the rich history of brewing in Maryland and the popularity of this beverage with George Washington and other famed characters who passed through Annapolis. Special Maryland Day discounts offered on featured beers. 4-7pm: free; 21 and older: Mills Fine Wine & Spirits, 87 Main Street, Annapolis: 410-263-2888; www.millswine.com  

Celebrate Bates’ Community, ­History and People

See a documentary on how Wiley H. Bates High School — the only high school for African Americans in Anne Arundel County from 1932 to 1966 — was restored as The Wiley H. Bates Heritage Park, home of The Wiley H. Bates Legacy Center and Memorial, a $27 million complex dedicated to preserving and presenting history. Learn more about the African American community in Annapolis through the documentary films, Carr’s Beach and Pip and Zastrow: An American Friendship. See the bigger picture in Dreams of Obama, interviews with people close to the president.

Celebrate Bates’ Community, ­History and People

See a documentary on how Wiley H. Bates High School — the only high school for African Americans in Anne Arundel County from 1932 to 1966 — was restored as The Wiley H. Bates Heritage Park, home of The Wiley H. Bates Legacy Center and Memorial, a $27 million complex dedicated to preserving and presenting history. Learn more about the African American community in Annapolis through the documentary films, Carr’s Beach and Pip and Zastrow: An American Friendship. See the bigger picture in Dreams of Obama, interviews with people close to the president.

Families Tour U.S. Naval Academy

Take a War of 1812 guided walking tour of the U.S. Naval Academy, concluding in the USNA Museum where you’ll see the original, restored Don’t Give Up the Ship flag. 9:30am or 3pm: $1. Armel-Leftwich Visitor Center (Enter at Gate 1, Randall St.): 410-293-8687; www.navyonline.com

Families Tour U.S. Naval Academy

Take a War of 1812 guided walking tour of the U.S. Naval Academy, concluding in the USNA Museum where you’ll see the original, restored Don’t Give Up the Ship flag. Friday, March 22, 10am or 3pm; Saturday, March 23 9:30am or 3pm: $1. Armel-Leftwich Visitor Center (Enter at Gate 1, Randall St.): 410-293-8687; www.navyonline.com

Meet The West Annapolis Fire and Improvement Company

Lindy Burkhart, Gayle Bender and Sharon Owen use old records, stories and photos to recount the history of the West Annapolis Fire Company, Inc. 7pm: free: West Annapolis Heritage Partnership, Melvin Ave. and Tucker St., West Annapolis: ­www.westannapolis.org/heritagepartnership.

Visit the 18th Century

The aspiration of young men has made lasting marks on Annapolis. Tobacco planter Matthias Hammond was only 25 and newly elected to the House of Delegates in 1774 when he commissioned this stately brick Georgian house with half-hexagonal wings on either side. Step inside and see for yourself. Kids ages five to 12 dress up to learn the niceties of colonial etiquette, including how to bow or curtsy. Souvenir postcards and coloring books reward genteel manners.

See the Enemy Nearly All Round Us

The War of 1812 came right to us. British warships sailed up the Chesapeake and aimed their guns toward Annapolis. In the new exhibit, The Enemy Nearly All Round Us Annapolis, you’ll learn how Maryland State Government protected citizens from attack; how the British made life difficult for Marylanders; and how enslaved African Americans made daring escapes in the midst of war.     You’re visiting America’s oldest continually working state house, so see it all on a self-guided tour.