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July 2013

Perched to take advantage of the sun

Long before dinosaurs walked the earth, dragonflies took to the air.     Griffenflies, the gigantic precursors of our modern-day dragonflies, took flight in the Carboniferous period over 300 million years ago.     Their descendants have had plenty of time to spread around the world. Ancient Celts called them big needle of wings. In England, they’re water dippers. In China, old glassy.

Local bounty is all around us, with roots in our hearts

Maryland’s Buy Local Challenge makes the typically sultry last week of July one of my favorite times of the year.     For those of us who take eating locally to heart, it’s no challenge to eat one local delicacy each day from July 20 through 28. Peaches for breakfast, tomatoes and basil for lunch, corn and crab for dinner — plus watermelon for breakfast, lunch and dinner: What’s not to like about that menu? It’s delicious, and it’s convenient.     So convenient that some of it grows steps from my door.

You need bees to get fruit, nuts and berries

At a recent garden club lecture, a member complained that she was not seeing apples on any of the five trees she planted three years ago. The trees were growing in full sun and had a full compliment of blooms this past spring. All were of the Golden Delicious variety.     Were any flowering crab apple trees in her area, I asked.     She was not aware of any.     That’s why her trees have no fruit.

… A white perch will do. If you can’t catch either, God bless you.

Setting up just north of the Sandy Point Light in 40 feet of water, our chum bag was soaking deep on its weighted line, and we were waiting for the rockfish to start to eat.     Our planned destination had been farther up the Bay. But as we passed the spot where we now fished, our electronic finder had marked such a large school of big fish that it stopped us short. Setting up about 75 yards off of the flank of a commercial hook-and-liner that had obviously noticed the same thing, we prepped our tackle,

A little Neil Simon and a little Seinfeld, it’s a lively summer diversion.

When The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife debuted on Broadway in 2000, one reviewer called its three leads the only three reasons to see Charles Busch’s breakthrough Tony-nominee. It’s not hard to see why.

Silly plotting and ridiculous dialog don’t dampen the fun of this bombastic action flick

In the near future, a rift opens up in the Pacific Ocean. Instead of a tsunami, the rift creates an inter-dimensional portal that allows building-sized monsters to enter our world. The Kaiju —the Japanese word for strange creature — aren’t visiting our planet to check out the tourist attractions. They’re here to destroy.

Bright pairings flank the full moon

Thursday the 18th, look to the lower left of the waxing gibbous moon for fiery Antares, the heart of Scorpius. Saturday, the near-full moon is less than 10 degrees below and to the right of Altair, the gleaming eye of Aquila the eagle and one of the three points in the Summer Triangle. Monday, the full moon blazes amid the dim stars of Capricorn. This moon is called the Buck Moon, the Thunder Moon and the Hay Moon.

KIDS Times at the Library

Crofton Library: 410-222-7915 • 11:30am, 1:30pm & 3:30pm: Nicolo the Jester juggles, tells stories and plays music. Fairview Library, Owings: 410-257-2101 • 2:30-3:30pm: Elementary schoolers have a story, craft and snack while learning about animals that dig. Prince Frederick Library: 410-535-0291 • 2:30-3:30pm: Elementary schoolers have a story, craft and snack while learning about animals that dig.

KIDS Times at the Library

Annapolis Library: 410-222-1750 • 9:30am, 11:30am & 1:30pm: Kids learn about science with comedy, music, juggling and magic. Eastport-Annapolis Neck Library: 410-222-1770 • 9:30am & 11:30am: Nicolo the Jester juggles, tells stories and plays music. Prince Frederick Library: 410-535-0291 • 2-3pm & 7-8pm: Kids watch Chesapeake Youth Players perform Indianapolis Jones Jr. and The Lost Book, then go on an archeology adventure.