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August 2013

There’s no retirement for these serial careerists

Versatility is a life preserver through changing times, and these are changing times.     For Labor Day’s Back to Work feature this year, we wanted to explore how citizens of Chesapeake Country were riding the waves.     So we set out in search of career changers.     That choice meant we’d be talking to people who’d been in the water for a while; thus people of a certain age. Our sample brought us ages from 42, Jared Littmann, to 75, Jim Lyles.

At 10 million oysters, SMOCS calls it quits

"Oysters are a lost cause. You’re going to fail."

Cicadas, crickets and katydids can create quite a racket

You hear them everywhere: driving in your car with the top down, sitting outside on a warm, summer evening and falling asleep to their songs with your windows open. Who are they? Cicadas, crickets and katydids — the trio you hear separately or together at all hours — starting in spring and belting out a peak performance this time of year.     Cicadas entice my cats with their buzz when their bodies spasm around on the ground.

Bowie Garden Club and Library

    Invited by Bowie Library to fill 18 empty planters that adorn the parking lot near the entrance to the library on Annapolis Road, the Bowie-Crofton Garden Club held a planting party.     Patuxent Nursery donated the plants. On an absolutely wonderful day for planting, Garden Club members Marsha Salzberg, Rich Buller, Susan Livera, Jackie Streeks, Bob and Joan Walker, Linda Snow, Barbara Eberstein and Jessie Smith set to organizing them.

Back to work has a whole new meaning in 21st century America

School’s back in session, Labor Day’s upon us, and we’re up for new challenges.     But just how much do we have to give?     I’m already leaning in, as Sheryl Sandberg advises. At Bay Weekly, it’s shoulder to the wheel and nose to the grindstone. My job doesn’t leave me much time to lollygag on Facebook, where Sandberg made her mark and millions.

Chef Michael Archibald of ­Herrington on the Bay and Honey’s Harvest

Anyone can spot Venus, but what about Neptune 3 billion miles away?

The waning crescent moon graces our pre-dawn skies, appearing lower and lower in the east throughout the week. The morning of the 31st, look for it near bright Jupiter. The following morning you’ll find the moon midway between a triangle of bright stars: the Gemini twins Castor and Pollux and Procyon in Canis Minor. Monday before dawn, the moon lights the way to ruddy Mars, above and to the left in the gathering morning twilight.

Act now or they’ll devour your narrow-leafed evergreens

Keep your eyes open and you’ll notice large sections of brown foliage in arborvitae, junipers, Leland cypress and pines. Look closely and you’ll see thousands of bagworms dangling from the branches.

Four ways to cook the Bay’s favorite fish

What a year we’ve had for rockfish! In our fifth month of abundance, big fish are still just about everywhere in the mid-Bay, with anglers catching them using just about every method.     Eating fresh Chesapeake rockfish is one of the perks of living in the Tidewater. One of the many attributes of the fish is that its flavor can be influenced by the addition of easy-to-make sauces, which can give a fresh rockfish dinner a completely different taste each time you serve it.

Five men save humanity one pint at a time

Gary King (Simon Pegg: Star Trek) fancied himself a god in high school. He and his band of followers debauched their way across their small town. A hard drinker, high and a hit with the ladies, Gary’s biggest regret is that he and his lackeys never finished the fabled Golden Mile, a one-mile pub crawl with 12 pints at 12 local bars.     Decades later, Gary is a paunchy, pale version of his former self. He drives the same car, wears the same dirty trench coat and is just as shiftless and hammered. What was sexy and mysterious at 18 is now pathetic.