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August 2015

Retreat in the City: 8 Steps to Happiness

Event Date:  September 19, 2015 - 10:00am - September 20, 2015 - 5:00pm Take a break from your busy city life by engaging in guided retreat. Give yourself the gift of meditating on expanding your ability to love and have compassion for others. Relax between sessions in the comfortable setting of the World Peace Temple, Cafe, and Gardens. Come for ½ day, a full day, or the entire weekend. Full Day Cost: $40/$35 for students, seniors 60 plus, and unemployed.- Includes Lunch Half Day Cost: $25/$20- Doesn’t include Lunch, but you can purchase lunch in our World Peace Café. Location Kadampa Meditation Center Maryland 900 E. Northern Parkway Baltimore, MD United States See map: Google Maps
Event Date:  October 27, 2015 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm Forage fishes are small, but abundant, fishes in Chesapeake Bay and other coastal waters. They are food for a multitude of predators, including striped bass, ospreys, and dolphins. The most abundant forage fish in the Bay is the Atlantic menhaden, which supports the Bay’s biggest fishery. CBL scientist Ed Houde will discuss forage fishes, their management, and implications for ecosystem-based management of fisheries. All seminars are free and open to the public. Light snacks and beverages will be provided. Location Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 142 Williams St., Solomons, MD 20688 United States See map: Google Maps
Event Date:  October 20, 2015 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm Low-oxygen areas, often referred to as “Dead Zones” in the popular media, are unwelcome yet common features of estuaries worldwide that have generally expanded in space and time during the past century. We invite you to a presentation describing the rich history of research related to the “Dead Zone” in Chesapeake Bay, with an emphasis on new insights into what controls the size of the dead zone, how its size has varied in past, and what we should expect in future decades. All seminars are free and open to the public. Light snacks and beverages will be provided. Location Chesapeake Biological Laboratory - Bernie Fowler Laboratory 142 Williams St., Solomons, MD 20688 United States See map: Google Maps
Event Date:  September 29, 2015 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm Oysters are iconic of both the Chesapeake Bay and our efforts to restore it to a healthy state. Efforts have focused on restoring entire reefs or establishing reserves to restore their ecological function and to support fisheries. Others have worked in developing aquaculture. An alternative being explored in the Potomac River is to use waterman cooperatives who buy “shares” in an oyster program that will plant triploid oysters in the river that will be available for harvest by shareholders after two years. Could this be the future of the oyster fishery? Location Chesapeake Biological Laboratory - Bernie Fowler Laboratory 142 Williams St., Solomons, MD 20688 United States See map: Google Maps

Science for Citizens "Can We Climate Proof Our Insurance?"

Event Date:  October 13, 2015 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm One of aspects of climate change is the escalating frequency and intensity of extreme weather events. CBL scientists have been studying precipitation thresholds that trigger an increased number of house insurance claims, and how many more days with such extreme precipitation we can expect to see in the future. In this seminar, Dr. Slava Lyubchich will show the results from statistical models that forecast how the future insurance risks might change based on alternative climate scenarios. All seminars are free and open to the public. Light snacks and beverages will be provided. Location Chesapeake Biological Laboratory - Bernie Fowler Laboratory 142 Williams St., Solomons, MD 20688 United States See map: Google Maps
Event Date:  October 6, 2015 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm Corals not only support beautiful coral reef ecosystems, they also record environmental conditions on reefs within their skeletal chemistry. Dr. Kilbourne will explain how she extracts climate records from corals, what she has learned about our climate system from corals and how that information can improve projections of future climate change. All seminars are free and open to the public. Light snacks and beverages will be provided. Please contact Sarah Brzezinski at 410-326-7460, or brzezins@umces.edu with any questions. Location Chesapeake Biological Laboratory - Bernie Fowler Laboratory 142 Williams Street, Solomons, MD 20688 United States See map: Google Maps

Where to turn for help and to help

Anne Arundel County Animal Control Shelter County animal management service handles nuisance animal issues, sponsors a Thursday rabies shot clinic, sells animal licenses and shelters found and abandoned animals temporarily before placement or euthanasia: 411 Maxwell Frye Rd., Millersville: 410-222-8900; aacounty.org/animalcontrol Calvert Animal Welfare League

Highway construction is a long and bumpy road

Ready for the end of road construction delays on your commute?     In early spring, heavy construction equipment arrived. Graders, backhoes and bulldozers dug into a summer of frantic activity, working on a backlog of road projects to alleviate traffic hold-ups and increase safety, in  part by adding left-turn lanes. As most road projects are concluded with new paving, timing counts. All the prep work needs to be complete so that roads can be laid before asphalt plants close for cold weather.

Four days to a plan-in-a-nutshell

If you could design your hometown, what would you want?     North Beach townsfolk just considered that question, describing their ideals to a team of planners from the American Planning Association. The pros listened, and in four late summer days, returned a quick-sketch plan complete with start-up instructions.

Osprey and eagles are no fine, feathered friends

Reading by the side of Loden’s Pond in Quiet Waters Park, I was distracted by a considerable racket up above. Three osprey, I saw looking up, were dive-bombing an eagle.     This year’s baby osprey are still growing. By mid-September, they must be almost fully mature to make their long trip to the Caribbean and the Amazon, where they’ll spend their first two years. As the juveniles are not yet fully grown, they’re an appealing dinner to omnivorous eagles. To short-circuit that meal, mature osprey attack eagles.