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Repurposed pages become art for the highest bidder

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle take on new meaning in Repurposed Books as Art, an auction-exhibit by artist Carolyn McHugh to benefit Calvert Library.
    McHugh has created 21 new ways of looking at a book: a clock, a wreath, a matchbook, a framed page, a music box, a planter, a candy dish, a tissue box, bookmarks, a birdhouse, a charging station, a jewelry box, a kitchen-utensil holder, a vase with flowers, purses with pins and Hattie the Hedgehog.

Common sense and caution help, but they may not be enough

The last thing we wanted to read was Bay Weekly’s ­October 3 story “On a Rock and a Hard Place: The Last Place in the World You Want to Take Your Boat.” Those nightmare memories didn’t need refreshing.
    That’s the kind of lament I’ve heard over the past week from people who know all too well the shock and painful aftermath of a hard landing.

Almost 100 years ago, peolpe were astounded to find such large fish

When Lester Trott, 95 years old this year, was born in Annapolis, the capital city had scarcely 9,000 residents.

Then throw your Rock Thoughts into cyberspace

Remember Pet Rocks?    
        The 1970s fad has returned with new legs to Annmarie Garden as a child’s game of hide and seek linked to a global art and collaborative storytelling project called Rock Thoughts.
    Closer to home, Sunderland art teacher Maria Lendacky invited her fourth-graders to add their Rock Thoughts to the 1,500 rocks created worldwide.

The right way is easier, ­cheaper and Bay-friendly

A Bay Weekly reader e-mailed me a flier titled Fall Lawn Maintenance: How to Outdo the Joneses.
    The first recommendation is to cut the lawn as short as possible to avoid problems with snow mold.
    However, snow mold is not a problem in southern Maryland.
    The same day I heard a so called-garden expert recommend scalping the lawn in the fall so that the grass will grow more roots.


In Short, if you love falafel, try this place. If you’ve never had falafel, start here with a place that does it right.

Here I am, at the Annapolis Power Boat Show, and as promised, the Market House is open. Sure, it’s a year late, but 20 years from now, will anyone remember?
    I’m making my fourth trip to Amsterdam Falafel House.

Ann-Wallis White floods the Caribbean with children’s books

The biggest catamaran at the U.S. Sail Boat Show is so highfalutin that only VIPs can board. Orion is reserved for the invited guests of Cruising World Magazine.
    You and seven friends could charter the 90-foot Catana — with amenities including four cabins, indoor and outdoor dining salons, Jacuzzi and crew of four — for a week in the Caribbean.

Three boys in the summer of 1940 try to salvage an abandoned skipjack

Around and about the Sailing Capital of America, pleasure sailing is a way of life.
    Yet it’s a recent invention, relatively speaking.
    It took hold in one community in the summer of 1940, when Paul McDonald was an admiring 10-year-old summering on the Chesapeake in Fairhaven, way down south in Anne Arundel County. The late McDonald’s memoir, written 69 years later, takes us back to that summer.


How to get the most from the U.S. Boat Shows

Annapolis may call itself the Sailing Capital of the World, but the United States Boat Shows make it the Boating Capital.
    The Sailboat Show came first, introducing Chesapeake Country to in-the-water boat shows in 1970. The Powerboat Show came in 1972. For 40 years, the Sailboat Show has traditionally led, with the boats arriving the first full week of October.

Water now to prevent winter damage

The drought we’re experiencing can cause significant bark injury to young trees with smooth bark if you don’t take immediate action and water them thoroughly. This is the time of year that trees have started to go dormant in preparation for winter. It is also their last opportunity to absorb the water they need to carry them through the winter.