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Why all the dilapidated barns around Southern Maryland?

Tobacco barns were good at drying tobacco; not so good at other jobs.
    Since the Colonial era, the Atlantic coast from Maryland to Georgia all the way inland to Kentucky was known for sweet tobacco. The key cash crop for generations of local farmers, it was cultivated until the early 2000s when Maryland’s Tobacco Buyout, funded through the national 1998 Master Settlement Agreement, pretty much ended tobacco farming and encouraged other crops.
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The Road to Recovery

Will you drive cancer patients to treatment?

If you, a friend or a loved one has battled cancer, you know that getting to and from treatment adds one more challenge. The American Cancer Society program Road to Recovery helps overcome that one. Last year, across the nation volunteer drivers used their cars to give 341,000 free rides to patients.
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One More Eye in the Sky

Demystifying that red helicopter

You don’t have to have been sobered by the movie Eye in the Sky to know that the airspace between us and the constellations is getting more traffic.
    What’s up there, you wonder?
    For that red-and-white helicopter you’ll see hovering above utility lines this spring, here’s the answer.
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Having fun, making a difference and driving the pump-out boat
 

Almost a year ago, the West/Rhode Riverkeeper completed a living shoreline project at the end of the Camp Letts peninsula on the Rhode River. Over the past few decades, the land had been eroding from storms, boat wake and sea level rise. Hundred-year-old trees were toppling over a sandy bluff, and the silt made the water look like a soy latte.
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Rivers and creeks need floodplains to absorb and trap runoff

If you’ve ever biked or driven down Muddy Creek Road in Edgewater, you may have caught a glimpse of its namesake: a small stream called Muddy Creek, roughly half a mile south of Mill Swamp Road.
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STEM program combines ­engineering and fun

Hallie Zlokovitz dips her fingers into a tub of sticky, greasy toilet ring wax and stuffs it into what looks like a film container. At the next table, Emily Ernst has pushed her sleeves up above her colorful bracelets so that she doesn’t get the wax on them. Kathryn Willhite takes sandpaper to the motors that power her Sea-3P0 model.
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Consignment auction raises funds for Anne Arundel County Young Farmers

Farming for Our Heritage is printed on T-shirts proudly worn by young farmers of Anne Arundel County. Their love of the soil and its bounty is inherited from parents and grandparents.
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School-age artists wanted to paint, draw and win prizes

Horses hold a special place in both the American heart and American art.
    Though not native to our continent, horses resonated with the great painters of the early American West — George Catlin, Karl Wimer and Frederick Remington — as symbols of primal power. Look in many middle schoolers’ notebooks or any art gallery, and you’ll see the tradition continues.
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Churches on a mission to save the Bay

Yes, we’ll gather at the river,
The beautiful, the beautiful river;
Gather with the saints at the river
That flows by the throne of God.
–Hymn by Robert Lowry

 

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Quilters Wanted

Help Calvert Start a Barn Quilt Trail

If barns aren’t the place you’d look for quilts, maybe you’re sticking too close to home. “Thousands of barn quilts exist around the country including some in Garrett County and Carroll County,” explains Bob Carpenter, executive director of the Arts Council of Calvert County.
    A barn quilt is a replica of one square from a quilt, painted on plywood (usually eight by eight feet) and mounted on the side of barn.
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