Features (Green Living)

A Bay Weekly conversation with landscape architect Sheila Brady
      We’re all converts, right? We’ve learned by heart the advantages of native plant gardens.
      They’re amenable to the peculiarities of our climate, which nowadays is peculiar indeed.
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Bay Weekly's annual Home & Garden Guide

Antique and vintage items can be used to enhance the garden and other outdoor spaces, even pools and ponds. Japanese fisherman’s floats, small garden sculptures and metal pieces can become focal points and can add whimsy and flair.
–Jane Walter and Paula Tanis, A Vintage Deale
 
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      What you bring into your home directly impacts the health and welfare of your family in terms of exposure to chemicals of concern, indoor air quality and comfort.
     With the deluge of products claiming to be environmentally sustainable, your need to know what to look for when furnishing your home. Here are some considerations to bear in mind.
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To connect with nature you must open yourself to its embrace

      In the woodland is a nice place to be. Here in Chesapeake Country we are fortunate to have some beautiful woodland. Sometimes the wood comes close to the house. Deer, birds, squirrels, hawks and other wildlife often show themselves along the boundaries of the woods or over the treetops. 
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How one little church restored a bit of nature

      The woods behind St. Luke’s Church in Eastport looked pretty natural. But if you’d trained your eye to nature’s ways, you saw a tangle of invasive plants strangling the native trees and shrubs. Deeper in, a 42-inch wide underground pipe drained stormwater along with sediment, ­toxins, pet waste and other unpleasant things from 28 surrounding acres directly into Back Creek.
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Students give up spring break to help save the Bay

     Think back a few years. What did you do with your time and talents during spring break from college days? Be careful now. Maybe you shouldn’t answer in front of the children. Fortunately for those of us who love the Chesapeake Bay, a new generation knows how to break from the past and spring into action.
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Take the family on a spring wildflower hunt 

     Spring is the season of renewal, a time of birth, regrowth and color. Along the shores of the Chesapeake, you’ll see an osprey, nesting material clinched in its powerful talons. Within the forest, your auditory sense is soothed to the music of returning songbirds, while the sweet scent of spring rain stimulates the olfactory nerves....

South River on the Half Shell ­celebrates South River Federation’s 17 years of success — and helps fund many more

      Chesapeake Country has no shortage of Bay champions. We have conservation organizations and nonprofits from mega-sized to tiny, from those that tackle the entire Bay to those that work locally on its rivers and streams.
South River Federation is a small but mighty hero of the Chesapeake.
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Teens Crochet for the Bay to aid Patuxent Riverkeeper and American Chestnut Land Trust
      Think today’s teens always have their hands busy texting or playing video games? Not Angela Arnold and her pals at Huntingtown High School in Calvert County.
      Arnold, a senior, is vice president of a club of teens who keep their hands busy with crochet hooks and yarn. Crochet for the Bay, now an official nonprofit student group, crafts handmade products to raise money for Bay conservation.
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Here’s a sneak peek

      Has your Chesapeake Bay license plate stopped sparking joy? Have its heron, crab and grasses against a field of blue lost their power to remind you, and your fellow motorists, to Treasure the Chesapeake? Is it just too familiar?
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