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Features (People)

London Town joins UNESCO’s Slave Route roll

       Another historic Chesapeake site joins UNESCO’s roll of Sites of Memory.

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Larry Taylor gives dead wood a second life

     There’s nothing like the sound of a chainsaw to catch Judy Taylor’s attention.
     That’s because following it may lead her to an opportunity that could keep her husband Larry Taylor happily engaged for hours at a time. When he disappears into his woodturner’s equivalent of a man cave, magic happens.
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At home or on the town

      St. Patrick’s Day, celebrated on March 17, is the anniversary of the death of the patron saint of Ireland. Kidnapped as a teen, Saint Patrick was brought to Ireland but eventually escaped to his native Britain. He later returned to Ireland and is credited with bringing Christianity to the Irish. He died in the fifth century. But on March 17, at least in America, everybody is Irish....

Archaeology and photography combine to ­dramatic effect

     Archaeologists throughout the Chesapeake are in a race against time to record sites threatened by the effects of climate change.
    Rising sea levels, eroding coasts and intense storms have washed away countless resources, some dating back thousands of years. Sinking land and rampant development have exacerbated the problem.­
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Group provides scholarships, college mentoring 

     Improving the Calvert County community one student at a time has earned Concerned Black Women of Calvert County the William Donald Schaefer Helping People Award. 

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Borrow for four months fine-free 

      Looking to “better serve the modern library,” the Calvert Library’s Board of Trustees is testing out dropping an age-old policy.

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Retired professor follows Maryland hero from Port Tobacco to Canada

        Uncle Tom lived many lives.  

         To the thousands of mid-19th-century readers of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s best-selling novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin, he was a heroic slave, his cabin home was heralded as a symbol of self-sacrifice. Yet to 20th century black Americans, his name lived as a symbol of subservience.

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New exhibit pays homage to forgotten trailblazer

      In 1962, Verda Freeman Welcome became the first African American woman elected to a state senate. Seven years later, she introduced legislation creating the first ethnic commission in the United States, the Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture. In celebration of the Commission’s 50th anniversary, the Banneker-Douglass Museum in Annapolis is opening a new exhibition Verda’s Place: An Homage to a Valiant Woman.

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Dynamic Dixieland Band reunites on Mardi Gras in his honor 

       Some called him Doc, some called him Dr. Jazz, others Dr. Circus — and a lucky few got to call him family. 
      By any name, Dr. Richard Hochman — who died last March at the age of 90 — was a man who made a lasting impression.
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