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Arts and Culture

Tour the county from Hole in the Barn Door to Mariner's Compass
     Calvert County’s mysterious new trail is not hidden, but you need a map or a guide to find and follow its course. Along the trail in plain sight are 17 wooden-framed images each with a design painted in an array of color combinations. Each has its own designation, like, Mariner’s Compass, Sawtooth Star or Farmer’s Daughter. The designs are so different that, despite being mostly fashioned on 8-by-8 or 4-by-4-foot frames, they don’t seem to have a central theme. 

See the place and its portraits this weekend

      Painter Suzanne Shelden likes her subjects — and canvases — big. So big that she’s making a reputation as a regional portraitist for Calvert County and its distinctive places. She’s made both a Rt. 4 series and the county in winter, painting huge canvases of her favorite sites plus places now vanished except in memory and photos.          “I do a lot of my observing and composing with my camera,” she told me.

Arts Alliance show celebrates the elements

      Weather plays out in high drama on the Bay’s big stage. In stormy weather, clouds sweep the sky in roiling 3D Technicolor, complete with sound and light effects.       In calmer weather, the blue sky repeats itself in blue water. Sunrise and sunset pull out their rainbow palettes. Sun and moon dance in gold and silver shimmers on the water.      No wonder artists are inspired by the drama of weather on the water.

Two of 10 National Heritage Fellows 

 

     The Old Line State is rich when it comes to art and culture. At least that’s the way we see it by having not one, but two Maryland artists named recipients of the 2019 National Heritage Fellowships. Only 10 were chosen nationwide.      Decoy carver Rich Smoker of Marion Station and Linda Goss of Baltimore have both been awarded the nation’s highest honor in the folk and traditional arts.

Experience the culture’s diversity at this annual festival 

 

      At the Annapolis Greek Festival, something magical happens. You become Greek for a day.      Hosted by the Saints Constantine & Helen Greek Orthodox Church on Riva Road from Thursday, May 30 to the following Sunday, the festival thrusts you into a makeshift Greek homeland. In this land, you’ll find more than 30 Greek foods and dishes, as well as four dance groups, two bands and vendors selling unique arts and crafts.

You won’t want to miss the ­Southern Maryland Celtic Festival

     Like the village that rises out of the mists in Scotland every hundred years in the 1954 movie Brigadoon, a park in St. Leonard comes alive with the sounds, smells and sights of the oldest Celtic celebration in Maryland.        But for just one day.       On that single day, Saturday, April 27, the annual Southern Maryland Celtic Festival at Jefferson Patterson Park resounds with bagpipes, drums, fiddles and celebration.

See the results at CalvART Gallery and Wimsey Cove

         It’s not a simple thing to convince two works of art to begin a dialogue with one another. But two local events are doing just that.          For Vision of Verses, 15 poets responded to 19 pieces of art created by the CalvART Gallery artists: paintings, ceramic sculpture, stained glass and photography.

New exhibit pays homage to forgotten trailblazer

      In 1962, Verda Freeman Welcome became the first African American woman elected to a state senate. Seven years later, she introduced legislation creating the first ethnic commission in the United States, the Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture. In celebration of the Commission’s 50th anniversary, the Banneker-Douglass Museum in Annapolis is opening a new exhibition Verda’s Place: An Homage to a Valiant Woman.

Round-robin painting makes its way Down Under and back

      A Facebook memory inspired artist Jane Connor to send an unfinished canvas on a journey around the world.       The social media site reminded Connor, owner of Wine & Design in North Beach, of an earlier failed attempt at a collaborative painting.
     Harry Potter in a museum? Hard to believe, but we’re about to hit the 20th anniversary of the U.S. publication of J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. Yes, those Hogwarts pupils are grown-up wizards now. The yearning for simpler magical times might be enough to draw one to the New York Historical Society, where the British Library exhibition of Harry Potter: A History of Magic is entering its final weeks.