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Food and Drink

Recipes from pros and prizewinners

      If there’s any day to bridge the gaping American divide, it’s Thanksgiving. On that great American feast, consensus rules. Eighty-eight percent of us report that turkey will be our Thanksgiving dish of choice, according to the National Turkey Federation. Certainly for me, one of the great pleasures of the day is the near unanimity of sharing in one great meal, all across the nation. 

Prize-winning recipes for the ­Chesapeake’s beloved bivalve

      Oysters are ours to eat again.       True, aquaculture ends the traditional summer drought, making oysters accessible all year long.
Behind the scenes at the National Oyster Cook-Off
Marty Hyson:  Smoked Chardonnay Oysters First Prize Hors D’Oeuvres; Best Presentation;  People’s Choice

Let someone else do the cooking

      Perhaps this is the year you’d prefer to give thanks for not cooking? Bay Weekly has gone hunting to report where you can eat out on Thanksgiving and what’s on the menu.   Brian Boru Buffet-served carved turkey, giblet gravy, ham, roast beef, filet of fish with lemon, shepherd’s pie; multiple side dishes; pecan and pumpkin pie, traditional Irish bread pudding.

Come April 20, the outdoor ­calendar starts filling up

         Spring is on the calendar. We had another lovely taste of warm weather last week. Yet the forecasters say not to pack away the winter gear as the thermometer struggles to reconcile with our expectations of spring.          Prepare your sacrifices to the weather gods, for as April moves forward, more and more outdoor events call us out of hibernation.          Here’s a look at some of the reasons to pray for warm weather.

South River on the Half Shell ­celebrates South River Federation’s 17 years of success — and helps fund many more

      Chesapeake Country has no shortage of Bay champions. We have conservation organizations and nonprofits from mega-sized to tiny, from those that tackle the entire Bay to those that work locally on its rivers and streams. South River Federation is a small but mighty hero of the Chesapeake.
Welcome to Bay Weekly’s annual Dining Guide, a tour of good eats and good eating.
In this ­special, you’ll visit the many restaurants, delis, groceries and seafood markets whose advertising in our pages brings you Bay Weekly 52 weeks of each year. Most are locally owned, and all are in our neighborhoods.       Each is unique in its offerings — from fin- and shellfish fresh from the Bay to fine beef to satisfying preparations and presentations whether homestyle or exotics to regionally famous wines and beers to inventive cocktails.

Making beer is fun. Can it also be a means to make a living?

       For beer lovers, this is a heady time. Some 1.15 million Americans brew beer at home, in their kitchens, garages and porches, according to the American Homebrew Association. Most are guys, and most older than 30.        “Access to information and equipment has never been better,” says John Morehead, the Association’s competition director, noting that in those areas, “the lines between professional and amateur bleed into each other.”

Fame and fortune could be yours at the National Oyster Cook-off

Can you create an oyster recipe worth $1,300?          Suit the taste of this year’s judges at the 38th Annual National Oyster Cook-off, and that grand prize will be yours.     Last year, Tammy Davis of Chesapeake Beach earned all that money and enduring culinary fame for her Coconut Curry Oyster Soup.

That’s the goal of Pirate’s Cove’s Pigs & Pearls Fundraiser to benefit the West & Rhode Riverkeeper

They say it was a hungry man who was the first to eat an oyster, but I disagree. I say it was a smart man, one who figured out how to set a bunch of oysters on a flat rock by a fire, cover them over with wet leaves and let them steam until they popped open, then slurped down all those succulent bits of salty goodness. Come to think of it, that was probably one smart woman who figured that out.