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Cooking

Good for gifting or keeping

The New Chesapeake Kitchen by John Shields with photographs by David W. Harp; John Hopkins University Press: $26.95

Odes to family, comfort

     At a moment of fraying connections, of nose-in-the-phone solitude and epidemic loneliness, Chesapeake Country offers one enduring remedy — the oyster.     Oysters are a great foodstuff of Maryland history and a treasure of our waters. But they’re also sinew in what binds families over generations, proved in the winner’s circle of the Annual National Oyster Cook-Off, part of Rotary Club of Lexington Park’s 53rd U.S. Oyster Festival in St. Mary’s County last month.
September may be your last chance
      Drying herbs creates savory seasonings, teas, aromatic potpourri and delightful herbal wreaths. We’re entering the late-harvest season, when both the intense heat that September can bring and the acute crispness of the night air tell us that the first frost is not too far away.       Follow these basic guidelines to capture the most flavor and fragrance.

Local family adds meat to your Eat Local repertoire

     Fourth-generation Anne Arundel County farmer Deana Tice wants to bring out the carnivore in your locavore.       “Most families don’t have the farm connection any more. Everyone needs to know where food comes from and how it’s raised,” she says. So Tice has made it her mission to “share our farm and agricultural lifestyle as much as possible.”

How to ace summer’s BBQ competition

 

     Step outside on any warm Maryland evening, and there is a very good chance you will find the aroma of food cooking on a neighbor’s grill. We have a love affair with grilling and barbecuing. Almost six percent of us grill more than once a week.

Freshly dug potatoes from your ­garden will spoil you

      Visiting Provence, France, many years ago, I was overwhelmed by the potatoes in the farmers markets. I saw so many beautiful varieties of potatoes, including bright red ones, soft pink ones, dark blue, lavender, yellow and all shades of brown. As well as colors, potatoes come in many shapes, including petite tubular potatoes known as fingerlings. Today you can find many of these different varieties in most grocery stores.

An international taste of the holidays

      In the great American melting pot, many families have a specialty that makes the holidays taste like home. Many of these recipes were passed down by family members who immigrated to the U.S.        Bay Weekly reached out to our friends and neighbors to see what food and drink from around the world are featured on their tables. We’re happy to share their treasured recipes with you.  

Recipes from pros and prizewinners

      If there’s any day to bridge the gaping American divide, it’s Thanksgiving. On that great American feast, consensus rules. Eighty-eight percent of us report that turkey will be our Thanksgiving dish of choice, according to the National Turkey Federation. Certainly for me, one of the great pleasures of the day is the near unanimity of sharing in one great meal, all across the nation. 

Prize-winning recipes for the ­Chesapeake’s beloved bivalve

      Oysters are ours to eat again.       True, aquaculture ends the traditional summer drought, making oysters accessible all year long.
Behind the scenes at the National Oyster Cook-Off
Marty Hyson:  Smoked Chardonnay Oysters First Prize Hors D’Oeuvres; Best Presentation;  People’s Choice