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Recipes

September may be your last chance
      Drying herbs creates savory seasonings, teas, aromatic potpourri and delightful herbal wreaths. We’re entering the late-harvest season, when both the intense heat that September can bring and the acute crispness of the night air tell us that the first frost is not too far away.       Follow these basic guidelines to capture the most flavor and fragrance.

You can eat the fruit and the flower

     My neighbors run away when they see me coming with armloads of zucchini. Yes, zucchini grows fast. But it is also a wonderful vegetable. Not only are the zucchini edible, so are the flowers.      In the Blue Zone of Ikaria, Greece, zucchini is used in a variety of ways. As much as I like to cook, in the summer I like to make easy uncomplicated dishes. I believe the hot weather in Ikaria also encourages people to do the same. 

An international taste of the holidays

      In the great American melting pot, many families have a specialty that makes the holidays taste like home. Many of these recipes were passed down by family members who immigrated to the U.S.        Bay Weekly reached out to our friends and neighbors to see what food and drink from around the world are featured on their tables. We’re happy to share their treasured recipes with you.  

Recipes from pros and prizewinners

      If there’s any day to bridge the gaping American divide, it’s Thanksgiving. On that great American feast, consensus rules. Eighty-eight percent of us report that turkey will be our Thanksgiving dish of choice, according to the National Turkey Federation. Certainly for me, one of the great pleasures of the day is the near unanimity of sharing in one great meal, all across the nation. 

Prize-winning recipes for the ­Chesapeake’s beloved bivalve

      Oysters are ours to eat again.       True, aquaculture ends the traditional summer drought, making oysters accessible all year long.

The best comes from your own patch

        Once you have eaten fresh homemade horseradish sauce, you will never want to eat the store-bought brands. It’s even better if the roots come from your own garden.        If you grow horseradish plants, now is the time to convert the roots to sauce. The hard freeze a couple weeks ago killed the foliage, and that dieback is essential to making a horseradish sauce that has the kick of a mule. 

Fame and fortune could be yours at the National Oyster Cook-off

Can you create an oyster recipe worth $1,300?          Suit the taste of this year’s judges at the 38th Annual National Oyster Cook-off, and that grand prize will be yours.     Last year, Tammy Davis of Chesapeake Beach earned all that money and enduring culinary fame for her Coconut Curry Oyster Soup.

Time, not effort, yields top-notch results

We find corned beef at delis, restaurants and at this time of year in groceries ready to boil for St. Patrick’s Day. This year I made it at home.     Do-it-yourself corning is neither complex, expensive nor labor-intensive. The challenge is finding the right containers for curing and cooking the beef. And maybe finding the refrigerator space.     There is nothing magical about the brisket. The traditional weight is six to eight pounds, but the recipe is just as successful with a smaller piece of meat.

A cookie lasts only a moment in your mouth, but Christmas cookies stay with you forever in memory.

Four Generations of ­Santaphant and ­Camelclaus

For the pros, it’s easy as pie

Thanksgiving dinner is never over until the pie is served.      If you’re seeking perfection but that final course is out of your comfort zone, turn to the professionals.         There are premium pies to be had in Chesapeake ­Country, and Bay Weekly has found them for you. Here’s what you’ll find at six champion pie bakers, from Prince Frederick to Severn.