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Boating

Career expo sets sights on teenagers

       Do you know a teen who loves boats or spending time on the water? Who loves technology, science or math?        Local employers are looking to hook such teens with a career in the marine and maritime trades.       The Eastport Yacht Club Foundation introduces students to industry professionals at the Marine and Maritime Career Expo at Annapolis High School this Saturday, February 24.

Fishing resumes with yellow perch

      Now is the time.       One of the better tasting fish (tied with white perch for first place), yellow perch are making their spring spawning run as you read. This is the best time to go after them, indeed probably the only time of the year when they are concentrated enough to make them your target. 
A “little taste of summer" drops anchor at the Baltimore Boat Show
      Why wait until spring to indulge your inner boat fanatic? Head to the 2018 Baltimore Boat Show to see what’s in store for this summer’s boating adventures.       “The show is a great outing for the whole family, whether you’ve been on the water your whole life or you’re looking to dip your toes into boating. We have a huge selection of dealers and boats, plus boating seminars for all skill levels,” says show manager David Bachinski.
Struggling to raise funds in Annapolis, project pulling anchor at City Dock
      Plans to relocate the National Sailing Hall of Fame from Annapolis to Newport, Rhode Island, are gathering new momentum, with terms of the move expected to be final by Thanksgiving.       Gary Jobson, president of the Hall of Fame, outlined plans for the move last month at a public workshop with city officials in Newport. The city is offering its Armory, a large waterfront building that Jobson called “absolutely perfect” for the Hall of Fame’s future home.

Bay Weekly’s Guide to the Boatshows

     The United States Sailboat and Powerboat Shows are the biggest in the country, and probably the world.       This year’s shows are bigger than ever, show president Paul Jacobs says, with “the largest sailboat show we’ve ever had and the biggest powerboat since the 2008 recession.”

Captain Preston Hartge keeps Smith Bros. tugboats chugging along

Drive down Galesville Road, and everything seems unassuming and in its proper place. The old churches, the auto shop, the town hall, the post office, the country bungalows and older homes, the boats in yards: the ambiance is old-school and peaceful.     At Woodfield Road, a small sign with an arrow points to Smith Bros. but doesn’t say what Smith Bros. does. Drive down a couple of residential blocks until you are head on with Hartge Yacht Yard, and another small Smith Bros. sign and arrow point left.

In his model boats, Norman Gross records maritime history

Watermen name their boats for their wives and girlfriends. There was a time when Norman Gross thought it a romantic gesture. Now, he’s not so sure.     “Why did the men name the boats after their wives? Was it because they loved them? Or was it because they say stuff on the boat they couldn’t say at home?” the 58-year-old Gross wonders.

German lifeboat did second duty as floating home and chapel

Touring the boats in the Patuxent Small Craft Center at the Calvert Marine Museum, you may notice a rather unusual looking model. Sitting near the Drum Point Lighthouse, this mash-up of houseboat and lifeboat is the Ark of Hungerford Creek.

Boats are only part of the fun

It’s a Melamud family ritual 30 years in the making. I announce I’m planning to go to the Annapolis Boat Show. My wife gets a puzzled look, then reminds me that our current boat is perfectly adequate and we are certainly not looking for a new one. I explain that the Boat Show is not just for people planning to buy a new boat; there are other reasons to go. I then promise not to buy a new boat. She wishes me a good time, and off I go.

Follow new Guide to “hidden gems”

You’ll find your way on the Magothy River with ease and insight with a copy of the brand-new Magothy River Water Trail Guide.     “Our river is like a hand with a narrow opening between Gibson Island and Persimmon Point and Dobbins Island in the palm,” says 20-year Magothy River Association president Paul Spadaro. “But what’s really worth experiencing are the fingers and fingernails.”