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Green Living

Board of Public Works approves Rural Legacy Program grants
      It’s been 20 years since Maryland acquired its first property to become a conservation easement as part of Maryland’s Rural Legacy Program.        Last week that program was approved for over $18.8 million in grant money for more easements in 18 counties thanks to the Board of Public Works.       Easements are voluntary, legal agreements that permanently limit land use for conservation.
     When I wrote my first story for Bay Weekly in the beginning of my senior year in high school, the Gingras name had already been mentioned in the paper’s pages.

Annapolis goes greener — with your help

      Add the City of Annapolis to the list of localities working to reduce their plastic footprint. Mayor Gavin Buckley signed a pledge encouraging all Annapolitans to reduce or eliminate their use of single-use plastics.          “We all know that there is far too much plastic waste. It’s in our landfills, in our waterways, polluting our oceans. We all have a responsibility to make the effort to reduce and eventually eliminate single-use plastics,” Buckley said.

Even small patches do heavy lifting

        A little green can go a long way.                Researchers at the University of Maryland have found that even small patches of urban forest are effective for managing and infiltrating stormwater.

Prince George’s County ups the fight against ­single-use plastics

     Fighting the bane of single-use plastics, Prince George’s County joins the battle against straws and stirrers.          The county council voted unanimously to approve the council bill banning the sale or distribution of single-use plastic straws and stirrers in all county restaurants and retail establishments. Now it goes to county executive Angela Alsobrooks for approval.

Waging a fight against Japanese stiltgrass

    Microstegium vimineum. It’s a mouthful to say. A more common name for this uninvited guest to the Bay region’s forest floors is Japanese stiltgrass. On the first day of November, a cool crisp fall day, three nature-lovers — including myself — inspected a local infestation of the grass in the Severn Run Natural Environmental Area in Gambrills.

Area locations make the switch to new paper cup

      You’ll skip the Styrofoam when you order coffee at the Dunkin’. The multinational chain — which most of us still think of as Dunkin Donuts — announced its commitment to get rid of all expanded polystyrene cups in its global supply chain by mid-2020.          Dunkin’ locations in Annapolis, Arnold, Edgewater, Lothian and Severna Park have already made the switch from foam cups to a new, double-walled, paper cup.

Proposed no-discharge zone would save area waters from boaters’ treated waste

      By next year’s fall boat shows, Annapolis Harbor and Anne Arundel County’s Bay tributaries will be a little cleaner. That’s because boats in those waters will no longer be allowed to discharge any sewage.          Discharging treated sewage is allowed in much of the Chesapeake and the Atlantic even within three miles of the coast. Only Herring Bay and the northern coastal bays near Ocean City are no-discharge zones, with no flushing allowed since 2002.

New electric options for boaters

      The 2019 Nobel Prize for chemistry was awarded to three scientists for their work developing lithium-ion batteries. The results of their work were on display at the U.S. Sailboat Show, applied in ways boaters can use to keep the beer and other essentials cold while using little or no fossil fuel.

Electric cars take over City Dock

     More than 500 Chesapeake residents are likely one step closer to hitting the streets around town in an electric vehicle.          They took that step at Annapolis Green’s Electric Vehicle Showcase at City Dock this weekend.          The annual event — now in its seventh year — is part of National Drive Electric Week, a celebration to heighten awareness of the widespread availability of plug-in vehicles and highlight their benefits.