view counter

Green Living

On water and land, our wakes stretch ­farther than we can see

In Edgewater, at Camp Letts, on a tiny peninsula that juts into the Rhode River, erosion could down a might oak. The tree has done yeoman’s work by keeping the soil in place. But even now, as a living shoreline restoration project undertaken by the West/Rhode Riverkeeper seeks to halt the degradation, the soil is sinking between the roots and falling into the river.     Erosion of this kind repeats throughout Chesapeake Country, where there are 11,684 miles of shoreline and over 100,000 waterways.

When enough people choose to help, large problems can be solved

The ecology of the planet is experiencing a time of rapid change and ­uncertainty. But we all have one very positive decision we can make: to try to make a difference anyway. In other words, to give a damn; it is a choice.     It is a lot like the story of the old man walking on the beach covered with hundreds of starfish washed up on the shore. A young girl sees him tossing starfish back into the sea. At first glance it seems a useless endeavor, even if it does make a difference to the ones that get thrown back.

Can’t get your boat to a pump-out station? One will come to you

If you spend much time on your boat, it’s probably got a head. What you put into the head can’t go into the Bay. It’s against the law to pump effluent into the Bay or its tributaries or within three miles of the U.S. coastline.

Hidden Harbour Marina honored as Clean Marina of the Year

Chesapeake Country has hundreds of marinas, each unique in its own way. They come in different sizes, different locations, different facilities — and different levels of cleanliness and Bay friendliness.

To buy the right bulb, you need to be an engineer

In the electrical department of a local big box home improvement store, I couldn’t help but overhear a woman mumbling, “When did things become so complicated?” I drifted in the other direction to avoid the drama.     Then I realized she wasn’t talking about her love life. She was trying to buy a light bulb. There were no sales people in sight. I’m not sure if I was motivated by human kindness, ­chivalry or the need to show off my knowledge from 40 years of electrical engineering. Whatever my reason, I volunteered to help.

Dry fall following wet summer makes a good show

This year will bring spectacular fall foliage coloration — provided it stays dry.     That’s what I told the Bay Weekly reader asking for my prediction.     More rain means that more of the leaves will remain green for a longer period of time, thus reducing the intensity of the red, orange and yellow. If we have a dry fall, a higher percentage of the leaves will turn color at the same time. But because of drier conditions, the foliage will not last long.

From juice pouches to chip bags, recycling makes cents

    With school starting, kids will be packing their lunches, gobbling individual snacks and drinks.     Ziploc sandwich bags, Capri Sun juice pouches, chip bags and the plastic wrap that protects a homemade cookie will all be thrown away after every lunch, destined to release carbon emissions in a landfill.     St. Paul’s Lutheran School in Glenn Burnie is taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint and, at the same time, cash in.

By paying Flush Tax, we’re all helping

However you play it, natural gas export is a high stakes game

     The biggest development proposed in Southern Maryland history looks much like a high-stakes game, with scenic Cove Point at the center of the board. At stake are millions of dollars in tax revenue, thousands of new jobs — and a quiet way of life Calvert County residents hope to preserve.

Unity Gardens spreads the green

Anne Arundel County blooms with the help of Unity Gardens twice a year. This non-profit organization raises money to helps community groups with twice-yearly grants to green their spaces. The new cycle to apply for grants up to $1,000 runs from July 1 through August 31. So act now or wait until January.