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History & Lore

Water/Ways Explores Resource that Surrounds Us
     Calvert County is the latest stop for the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service’s Water/Ways exhibit. The show, which has already made stops in Cambridge and Crisfield, explores the centrality of water in our lives: its effect on the environment and climate, its role in agriculture and economic planning and its impact on culture.      The exhibit includes photographs, touchscreen kiosks, interactive models and an iPad that runs a visualization tool called WaterSim.
London Town’s Immersion Day is lesson in colonial-style survival
      From runny noses and dry skin to icy car windows and high heating bills, winter provides plenty to complain about. Add to these annoyances the drastic decline in opportunities to do so many things we love on the Bay, and the chilly months seem downright unbearable.      But visit with the 30 or so volunteer reenactors who recently spent an entire weekend living like it was 1771 at Historic London Town and Gardens in Edgewater and you’ll quickly put this thought to rest.

 

Research uncovers impact of freed slaves 

     A good book is a treasure. Thanks to author Mary Rockefeller, a new treasure that tells the story of Calvert County schools now adorns book shelves.       Early Schools of Calvert County Maryland, Rockefeller’s first book, details the history of schools from the era of one-room schoolhouses to a century after the Civil War.

Volunteer on MLK Day of Service to reap mental health rewards

“Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, what are you doing for others?”  – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.            While an extra Monday off work or school may feel like a chance to relax and veg out, Martin Luther King Jr. Day was actually put in place for you to follow his example—making it a day “on,” not a day off.
     When I wrote my first story for Bay Weekly in the beginning of my senior year in high school, the Gingras name had already been mentioned in the paper’s pages.

By whatever name he goes, we know him well

He’s St. Nicholas …      Born around 280AD in a coastal town near modern-day Turkey, St. Nicholas began his legend as a monk. Caring for the poor and sick became his life’s focus.      Said to have given away all of his wealth, he became well known for his kindness and as a protector of children and sailors.
For that, I found three good gifts and one perfect one
     My folks thought the best things in life were free, but they bent that rule for the Yule, which was why God made J.J. Newberry’s. You could get anything there, cheap.

Three teenage friends playing Santa and his elves discover the joy of the season 

     What’s the first thing you look at when you see Santa? Sure, you take a quick glance at the outfit, the beard. But you’re drawn immediately to the eyes. You notice the joy, the special feeling that anyone assuming that role feels when eyes young and old are looking into his, children searching for the Spirit of Christmas, adults searching for their childhood. 

When oyster stew required a very big pot

     There’s much to learn from studying oysters from long ago, according to newly published research from two William & Mary professors.          Rowan Lockwood, who chairs the Geology Department, and Roger Mann, a professor in the Department of Fisheries Science, report their findings in a fascinating new paper based on examining oyster reefs from the Pleistocene epoch — which stretched until about 12,000 years ago.

Mary Kilbourne: 1936-2019

     Ask Mary Kilbourne’s friends and former students what they remember about her, you’ll hear about banding birds, seining a pond to find water scorpions, the latest Envirothon or leading Cub Scouts on a trek through the woods — and underlying it all her passion for wildlife, nature and the earth. She was a naturalist and an enthusiastic protector of local rivers and natural spaces, testifying against development of dwindling wooded spaces.