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People

A Bay Weekly conversation with writer, birder and ­educator Katie Fallon

       Ewww, vultures! How can you stand them?       Katie Fallon, who finds lots to love about those bare-headed carrion-eaters that so many find fearsome and disgusting, has heard it all before. Fallon is a vulture advocate and in the business of changing minds. So she hopes her March 21 audience at Quiet Waters Park will leave with a new appreciation for the birds and the role these fabulous flyers play in our ecosystem.

Marine Aquarium Society hosts conference

      You may not find Nemo or Dory, but a local club hopes you still find inspiration in the wonders of a saltwater tank.       The Southern Maryland Marine Aquarium Society is a dedicated cadre of marine hobbyists seeking to spread their love of saltwater tanks and to raise awareness of the delicate coral reefs they tend therein.

An immigrant expresses her ­gratitude through the Peace Corps

      I am serving my country abroad, and my country is America. I can’t quite believe it. The words conjure pictures of soldiers, brave and resolute in uniform, or ambassadors, smooth and sophisticated. I am neither, and I am a novice American. I was born in Ireland, a British citizen from Belfast. I moved to the U.S. in the early 2000s.

Chesapeake Church provides 1.7 million pounds of food annually

       Drive past most any place of worship in the middle of the day in the middle of the week and you might see a few more cars than at a Chick-Fil-A on a Sunday.        But make a pilgrimage to the Chesapeake Church any day, most any time of the week, and you would think you’ve parked in front of a new coffee boutique at a ski lodge or …

How young artists view our great estuary

       Each of us Bay-lovers sees the Chesapeake in a different way. Especially important is how young Marylanders see our great estuary, for its survival will soon be in their hands.         March has been celebrated in Maryland for 57 years as Youth Art Month.         This month, you can see the new  160-piece exhibit, Portraits of the Chesapeake Bay, just up at Calvert Marine Museum.

Maryland First Lady Yumi Hogan and 5th-grade artists will

       Yumi Hogan, artist and Maryland’s First Lady, looked carefully at each poster created by our state’s 10 fifth-grade finalists in honor of trees. The posters ranged from a wordless black-ink-and-rainbow-colored tree … to a tree in winter with a lone child on a swing hanging from one of its snow-covered branches … to many illustrating all that trees do for their fellow earth dwellers: photosynthesis, habitat, oxygen, shade and more. 
Forensic artist puts images to 200-year-old descriptions
       Lot Bell, who became a free woman in 1816, survived through two centuries of history in a few words written by the man who had claimed her ownership. Granting Lot her freedom in his last will and testament, ­Silbey Bell described her of “pretty dark complexion, long face and high cheek bones … a very remarkable scar on her head on the left side thereof which resembles a mulberry very much.” On the 30-year-old woman’s Certificate of Freedom, those words were the equivalent of her passport photo.

Researchers track down slave descendants’ legacies

Legacy (n) 1. Any special privilege accorded a firstborn. 2. Something immaterial that is passed from one generation to another.  

Career expo sets sights on teenagers

       Do you know a teen who loves boats or spending time on the water? Who loves technology, science or math?        Local employers are looking to hook such teens with a career in the marine and maritime trades.       The Eastport Yacht Club Foundation introduces students to industry professionals at the Marine and Maritime Career Expo at Annapolis High School this Saturday, February 24.

Dr. Joan Gaither’s quilts document lives and history

      Mention quilts, and people often share memories of grandmothers or great aunts working with needle and thread, joining pieces of fabric with precise stitching.       Dr. Joan Gaither, who documents history with cloth and thread, describes herself as “a quilter who breaks all the rules.” Her quilts are covered with images, words and objects: buttons, ribbons, pieces of jewelry, shells — anything that can be sewn to fabric and symbolizes an aspect of the story she tells.