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Places

Unearthing a forgotten past

At Serenity Farm in Benedict, you’ll find 100 acres devoted to Farming 4 Hunger (see this week’s feature story). It’s also a place for farm tours and events, hayrides and petting zoo, shearing sheep and tobacco barns.     Maryland’s history is rooted there, too.     The recently discovered Burial Ground at Serenity Farm unlocks secrets and pieces together from crumbling bones lives lost in the past.

The closest you can get to World War II

A legendary World War II-era B-17 Flying Fortress takes to the skies this weekend.     “This is the closest thing you can get to the battlefield experience,” said Bob Hill, chief Liberty Foundation pilot.     The B-17 was a workhorse in bombing raids over Germany in World War II. Some 4,735 B-17 aircraft were lost in combat during the war.  The bombers’ 10-man crews flew each mission knowing there was a 3-to-1 probability they would not return safely.

One good trip recommends another

Scene: Living Room Mackenzie: Mom! What are we going to do for vacation this year? Heather: I don’t know. I haven’t thought that far. Any ideas?

Get in touch with wildlife at ­Patuxent Research Refuge

Take a summer morning to escape the hustle and bustle in one of the verdant national wildlife refuges created by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.     I escaped to the Patuxent Research Refuge South Tract in Laurel. Taking a deep breath as I drove through the long entry way, I felt my mind and body relax.     The morning song of birds filled the wooded area. I found the brilliant greens and deep blue waters of lakes. Water lilies bloomed and great blue herons were fishing along the shore.

Time traveling at Chesapeake Marketplace

Antiques? Do you like them?    

Go quietly, look and listen

The best part of the Bay is just that. The water. Some like to race across the waves, bow plowing through each crest, spray flying with each jolt. I prefer to slip my kayak into the shallows and paddle the edges.

Visiting friends and family gets you go-go-going

I lived on the verge of our nation’s capital my whole life until I moved to Vermont to go to college. Only when a friend from Sweden came home with me for spring break did I understand the treasure I’d taken for granted.

For a sweet birthday, plan a favorites tour

My beloved, Nick, and I were three months into our relationship when his birthday arrived in August 2008. By then I knew what interested him — history, travel, sculpting — well enough to plan a day trip that combined it all. I did not tell him where we would go, just to wear sturdy shoes and bring a cap and sunscreen.     On a sunny Sunday, we headed south on Route 2, eventually ending up at Colton’s Point in St. Mary’s County.

Summer happens at the ballpark

Some little girls have tiaras; I had a baseball cap. My parents raised me to believe in life, liberty and the pursuit of Baltimore baseball. I knew the players, their averages and that the Yankees were evil before I could tie my shoes. I also knew that shouting “O!” was perfectly appropriate during the National Anthem.

On and in the waters of the Patuxent

Old barns dripping with honeysuckle and trumpet vines, owlets in cobwebbed rafters, fishermen’s shacks on piers glistening with old fish scales, swallows’ nests glued beneath the splintery planks, pilings where ospreys build their messy nests like ornithological games of pick-up-sticks, duck blinds where wild ducks nest …