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Things

See the results at CalvART Gallery and Wimsey Cove

         It’s not a simple thing to convince two works of art to begin a dialogue with one another. But two local events are doing just that.          For Vision of Verses, 15 poets responded to 19 pieces of art created by the CalvART Gallery artists: paintings, ceramic sculpture, stained glass and photography.

A visit will convince you spring is really here

    I’m finally starting to believe spring is here, but I need an extra nudge. Fortunately, the spring boat show is this week.      As you’d expect, the star of every boat show is boats. This year’s show continues the industry’s recovery since the crash of 2008 and features more than 400 boats. The lineup includes boats of many types, from seven to 70 feet. But the boat show experience is more than boarding boats and talking to sales representatives.

Inside a dispensary, there’s a dizzying array of medical ­marijuana selections to help you feel better. Here’s how to see for yourself.

     Step inside a Maryland medical cannabis dispensary and you feel like Alice in Wonderland. Eat me, drink me, smoke me, say the amazing controlled substances here, all Maryland-grown and produced to painstaking standards — though their clever packaging and branding does not reveal what will happen when you do. All this in a deli-style setting (yes, that’s what they call it) that more closely resembles a boutique wine bar than a display of products for pain or other afflictions.

Should snappers be saved?

      The common snapping turtle is not so attractive or charming as its terrapin cousin, but it has its own fan base. The nonprofit Center for Biological Diversity has petitioned Maryland Department of Natural Resources to end commercial collection of these wild freshwater turtles.

Larry Taylor gives dead wood a second life

     There’s nothing like the sound of a chainsaw to catch Judy Taylor’s attention.      That’s because following it may lead her to an opportunity that could keep her husband Larry Taylor happily engaged for hours at a time. When he disappears into his woodturner’s equivalent of a man cave, magic happens.

Dedicated as osprey parents are, their chicks need luck — and good weather — to survive

      I am waiting. Every spring, I wait for my two osprey to return to their nest along Maryland Route 4 near Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary. I call them my osprey because I watch their progress on my commute home, and each year I note whether they are able to raise young. It is an interesting show with daily installments.      This year, I also wait to see if the pair will be more successful than in 2018, when they didn’t manage to raise any young.

New effort to protect Chincoteague ponies

      Those wild ponies roaming Assateague Island have been around since the 17th century after surviving a shipwreck, as the story goes. They’ve withstood wars, hurricanes, drunk drivers and tourists trying to feed them potato chips.       But four centuries after their arrival, the Chincoteague ponies may be falling victim to another scourge: climate change.

$10K helps make veteran-service dog matches

      Trained to retrieve items, alert their partner to important sounds such as a doorbell or alarm, operate light switches and seek help in an emergency, service dogs help many veterans and first responders with disabilities achieve independence. Partnering with a service dog is free.        But preparing those dogs is an expensive and specialized business. The cost of the dog, medical fees and training can run close to $25,000.       Now, Maryland will help pay the bill.

And learn to politely disagree

       A debate on Asian oysters engaged Sunderland Elementary School students in reading, writing and speaking — skills the world’s first universities considered essential for leading and for promoting the best ideas.       Rising to the challenge, students went beyond arguing pro or con.

Borrow for four months fine-free 

      Looking to “better serve the modern library,” the Calvert Library’s Board of Trustees is testing out dropping an age-old policy.       March begins a four-month pilot of no late fees for checked-out materials. That means materials checked out at Calvert Library branches incur no fees if kept beyond their due date. Automatic renewal will continue for four circulation cycles if no one is waiting for the item.