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Letter from the Editor

 

Time to salute spring, celebrate Maryland Day

     In Daylight Saving Time’s second week, my internal clock is catching up. In the morning, I can rise lazily with the sun just after 7 o’clock. But morning by morning I’ll be rising earlier as sunrise accelerates minute by minute. Those folks on the Eastern Shore whose job is releasing the sun are working faster every morning. We’ve gained 17 minutes of early light since setting our clocks ahead.

Nowadays they’re the talk of the town

     When you live in Chesapeake Country, oysters are your neighbors.      You can’t help running into them. Oyster culture is woven into the fabric of our lives. That’s true in both senses of the word. 

Imagine how long they’ll be when the kids are

out of school — and read Camp Guide

The peculiarities of the American school year confine kids to a regime of classroom and

With all the usual in between

      Race in America is getting to be like the weather in that everybody’s talking about it. Bay Weekly is in on the discussion, with Black History Month coverage that has people talking. 
That may be the challenge of our times
       We’ve come a long way since the early 1990s, when I wondered whether we ought to bother with special stories for Black History Month. Shouldn’t we just integrate stories about black people into our regular coverage?

Love, inspiration and a bit of praise for men in high places

      Those SweetHeart candies you won’t find on the shelves this year (unless they’re left over from 2018, though who would know) offered us a range of flavors and messages. Bay Weekly is stepping up to fill their void this week with a collection of stories that range from love to beyond.
This issue invites you to come on in
     Restaurant peeping is one of the pleasures you give up to live in much of Chesapeake Country. We who live in the country or suburbia just don’t get it. Shopping strips and centers can’t touch it. Only Annapolis, Solomons and the Twin Beaches offer the density of destinations that encourages you to stroll through town, seeing what’s on offer before you make your choice.
Every Bay Weekly story is a little like the New Horizons spacecraft
      Bob Melamud likes to be the man behind the story, his hand revealed only by a reliably regular byline in Bay Weekly. Now, I’ll tell you a secret about him. He spent most of his career as an aerospace engineer. So when the NASA press release popped up in my email inbox early last November, I reckoned that Bob’s perfect story had come along.       “NASA Announces Media Activities for New Horizons’ New Year’s Kuiper Belt Flyby,” read its headline.
Look at oyster restoration as a saga and this week’s story as an episode
      There are many fish in the sea, my grand­mother said, though her fish were metaphors for chances at love. In our Bay, there are many real oysters, despite the widely acknowledged plunge of their population to one percent of their historic abundance. Also numerous are the ways our Chesapeake oyster states, both Maryland and Virginia, seek to promote the species’ renewal.

Here’s how, each week, we assemble a winning hand

     What have the cards dealt us this week?      The drama of journalism is that you never know what hand the world will deal you.