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Letter from the Editor

Read this week’s paper with caution; it could lead you astray

Summer did its job on me.         It gave me plenty of time outdoors, much of it on the water, by the water and in the water, which is my favorite form of renewal.

Preserve their legacies and honor their memories

This time of year, you’d rather think of anything but September 11, 2001.

Tell that to the people you meet this week

Everybody’s got a story.         Many of those stories are never told.     Children grow up with no idea of their mothers’ and fathers’ hopes and dreams, struggles and frustrations, hard roads and high times, determination and doubt. This very week, two friends have told me, with regret: “I never knew …”

By our work we make ourselves and our world

Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages, the poet Chaucer wrote in the century before Columbus bumped into the New World, and I know what he means. Not April, when his folk were longen, but August — the last slice of summer before Labor Day sets the work year rolling again — puts the longen in me.

Precious time is ticking away

This time of year makes you think like that.         If seasons had clocks to tell the passing of their days, we’d read the numbers 8:25 with advancing insight.

I’m inspissated. How about you?

Too hot to move. Too hot to cook. Too hot to exercise (except water aerobics). Too hot to sleep.     Just how hot is it?     Hotter than it’s ever been — relatively speaking.     “July 2016 was absolutely the hottest month since the instrumental records began,” the Baltimore Sun reminds me, sourcing NASA.     July 2002 felt plenty miserable to then Bay Weekly contributor April Falcon Doss. Heat, she reminded us, is relative — and so is our experience of it.

And what our cats see in us

What could she see in him?         I’ve often wondered that about my friends’ husbands. Even more often, about their dogs.     Husbands are more ambiguous. Dogs are absolute.     Love me, love my dog, my grandmother taught me, was the rule of friendship with a dog fancier — which my grandmother was not. Not, love me, love my husband.

Progress in the Bay … Opportunity in the Cook-off

It takes a long time — two to three years — for an ­oyster to grow up.     It takes even longer for science to puzzle out how to make the best environment for healthy oysters.     Just out is the first five-year report on how oysters are faring since Maryland decided to give our native oysters the best chance for survival. The best chance scientists and fishery managers could imagine, that is.

Vegetables from A to Z — plus a little free protein at the K

As July rolls into August, locavores are in high corn. Literally, for in the fields around us corn is reaching to the sky. Figuratively, because we can eat our fill of Maryland-grown sweet well-kernelled ears — along with all the complementary fruits of the season, from beans to zucchini, with plenty of tomatoes along the way. Mid-summer’s harvest supplies a fruit or vegetable for every letter of the alphabet, except maybe X.

Caught live and dressed for you this and every week in Bay Weekly

What do you love to do?         Discovering what that is and making the time to do it is a key to a happy life.     I learned that lesson from Joe Akers, who when I met him had stepped back from the stage of world affairs to take over a small-town Illinois newspaper.