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Letter from the Editor

Let us count the ways

A couple of tried, true and trite figures of speech can help you understand the week’s layered news on the health of the Bay.     Can you walk and chew gum at the same time? Practicing that feat of coordination will prepare you to understand the new Chesapeake Bay Program take on how we’re doing in cleaning up the Bay we all say we love.     The good news is the Bay diet is working.     We’re actually cutting back the fast-food diet of nutrients and sediment streaming into our Bay.

Sometimes, we could have used an expert

In my early memory, mother is tearing down a wall, a sledgehammer shattering the plaster and lathing. One of us, I don’t remember which, stepped on a nail and had to have a tetanus shot. As mother struck her blows, my father may well have been telling her a story. That was the role she sweetly assigned him when they shared a job.     If there was a job that needed doing, Mother was the woman to do it, whether or not she knew how.     Can you see where this story is heading? Maybe I should have stuck with telling stories.

Spring has us out in fellowship, purpose and celebration

March 20 was the last day of winter. March 21 was the first full day of spring.     As you’ll remember, a season divided those days. Winter threw a hissy fit on its way out. Spring warmed our chilled hearts and invited us out.

We’re the top strata

History is the byproduct of daily life.         Dip a toe or jump into Maryland Day celebrations and you drift into that conclusion.

Snow, too, if I had my way

I’d love to tax the rain.     

Seizing life’s moments while dreaming of summer days at camp

This week’s paper, featuring our annual Summer Camp Guide, is not 100 percent wishful thinking.     But enough of it is to take your mind off present ­circumstances.

Harriet Tubman now conducting tours

History is a bigger hall nowadays, with room at the table for more people than the old white guys who used to rule there. So a good story for any week of the year is the new prominence coming to Harriet Tubman as a hero of Maryland, New York and our nation.     Harriet Tubman, a contemporary of Abe Lincoln, escaped slavery only to return home, to Dorchester County, to conduct many more enslaved people along the Underground Railroad she had followed to freedom.

Can our Free Will Astrologer break the late-winter blues?

Now is the winter of our discontent.         Cold February lingers like a crust of dirty snow. Pipes freeze and people shiver. Spring may be only weeks away, but getting there is a slog.     You’ve got to be real creative to talk yourself out of such a state.     Enter Rob Breszny, our Free Will Astrologer.

Start with a little resveratrol, add tryptophane …

My mother was not always right.         But in hitting the nail on the head, she had far better accuracy than I credited.     A woman who believed she could do anything, she invested even more of her capital in cooking than she did in looking good. And she looked very, very good.     The way to a man’s heart is his stomach, she advised.     Ohhh mother! I scoffed, for that was back in the day when I believed love sought you for yourself alone.

Six more weeks of winter? Let it snow.

At first it shone fresh in memory, the gold filigree earring formed on a redbud leaf bought for me by my husband on a book tour visit to Nebraska’s Arbor Day Farm, where good practical environmentalism pairs abundantly with good food. But in the cold days and weeks after I lost it — after I’d searched coat collars, scarves, carpets and car crannies —it faded into forgetfulness.