view counter

Letter from the Editor

Use the right sunscreen as you have your fun

The best times of summer are the hours we spend outdoors.     I bet you’re planning plenty such hours. Aiding and abetting your plans are Bay Weekly’s 8 Days a Week and 101 Ways to Have Fun: Your Indispensable Guide to Summer on the Chesapeake.     Both are packed with things to do on land and on water, where breezes tame the worst of Chesapeake Country’s heat and humidity, and when they fail, you can jump in.

101 Ways and counting

I haven’t yet worn out my personal copy of 101 Ways to Have Fun: Your Indispensable Guide to Summer. But its pages are already dog-eared to mark the many spots I want to revisit.     Fireworks, for example.

Accidents put such a crimp on summer fun

Memorial Day weekend puts us back in the water, where some of the best fun of summer is to be had.     In its liquid embrace, our nature changes. From land-locked pedestrians, we become swimmers and skimmers. We recover a bit of the fluidity we had in our beginnings, in utero and in evolution. It feels good — as long as we’re afloat. But liquidity can go all wrong in a instant.

Summer’s just around the corner — and with it comes 101 Ways to Have Fun 2011

Here at Bay Weekly, we’re eager as elves at Santa’s workshop the week before Christmas.     It’s not just that a big project is nearing its celebratory conclusion, though that’s certainly part of the energetic anticipation we’re feeling.

Your job: Party hearty

About now, the men and women of Parole Rotary must be regretting their dedication to good works.     True, doing good is even more intrinsic than weekly meetings to Rotary, with its motto of Service Before Self and its logo wheel that keeps turning because some 1.2 million members worldwide keep pushing.

Splendid though our stories are of Mother’s influence, I bet you can top them

Margaret Tearman’s bright idea for Bay Weekly’s annual Mother’s Day story has kept me chuckling since its light popped on in her brain months ago. In the instant of illumination, she wrote her Mother Made Me essay, and that was all it took to sell me on the idea.     The Bay Weekly family of writers reacted the same way. Within minutes after I sent out the call for stories on that theme, I had five early reservations and one completed story.

I’m sorry to see you go

Like newspapers — I mean the print variety — politicians are news one day and fish wrap the next. That was not the case with William Donald Schaefer.     On a Maryland scale, Schaefer was God in his heavens. We might not think of him everyday, but if we ignored him too long, the thunder would roar — and lightning might strike.

We stand with our feet in the water and our hands dirty from digging in the earth.

If you’re a mechanic, you open a garage. If you’re a cook, you open a restaurant. If you’re a horsewoman, you open a stable. If you’re newspaper people, you open a newspaper.     You do what you know. That’s why we — husband Bill Lambrecht, son J. Alex Knoll and I — opened New Bay Times, on 1993’s chill, rainy Earth Day.

Policy’s fashion color of the year is pale green

Earth Day is a lot like of St. Patrick’s Day.         We dress up in green both days, and we throw parties and maybe march in a parade. But the next morning, the green washes off.

Plus triumphs in words and deeds

Eighty degrees on April 4! With sweat on our brows, women in sleeveless dresses and men in shorts, summer insinuated itself into early spring — and into our hearts and minds.