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Special Editions

Arbor Terrace Waugh Chapel      Opening in the spring of 2019, Arbor Terrace Waugh Chapel offers brand-new one- and two-bedroom and studio senior living apartments with special services for people needing care support, memory care and medication management.       On Friday, Oct. 4 (4-6pm) Get an early look at the Arbor Terrace Waugh Chapel Welcome Center grand opening, with food, drinks, music and hard-hat tours of the community.
Mobility for when life slows you down 
       Aging, accidents and illness can make moving difficult. Perhaps you have slowed down to a point that going to the park, to the mall, or to see the grandkids play ball is now difficult and not as enjoyable.       Confinement need not be your fate. Technology has evolved some remarkable devices to aid in recovering some of the mobility and independence you may have been deprived of.
Who do you rely on?
       It starts with the grass becoming the height of wheat … a fall … … failing eyesight … difficulty driving.          Non-medical concierge-care fills a niche need for a particular group of people at a special transitional time in their lives. A health-care concierge provides all the little assists that mean people can stay in their homes for much longer and far more comfortably and safely than they thought possible.

Sometimes, you can’t

      For reasons of age, health, dementia or discharge from a hospital or rehab center, people may need some extra help to live safely and independently in their own homes.

Sometimes, you can’t

      For reasons of age, health, dementia or discharge from a hospital or rehab center, people may need some extra help to live safely and independently in their own homes.
A hard course to navigate
      Meeting a frail older adult parent’s needs can become overwhelming. The difficulty is greater when you live too far away to keep an eye on changes in health and needs advancing beyond your parent’s ability to keep up. What’s more, community resources are often limited, fragmented or uncoordinated. 

The hardest part is getting started

      Have you thought about how you are going to have that difficult talk with your aging parents?      The talk reminded me of talking to teen-aged children about sex, drugs and bad friends. So I delayed having that talk with my 80-year-old father.        Dad was living by himself after the loss of his wife, my mother. The family assumed that he was doing well. For the most part, he did well caring for himself. Then the day came.

How do you manage?

     How do you get the family house ready for sale? Yes, it needs work. Who has time to handle all the details?       We’re professionals — experienced real estate market consultants and property renovators — and even we struggled when faced with the family transition dynamic firsthand.
Sorting through a lifetime of ­memories and mementos can be a daunting task
      A three-bedroom, two-bathroom ranch house with a sprawling yard makes sense for families with kids and a dog and bikes and extra cars.        For empty-nesters, though, that big, beautiful house often just becomes a list of Saturday morning chores — mowing the yard, cleaning more bathrooms than you use on a regular basis and vacuuming bedrooms that no one is sleeping in but are filled up with old belongings you think about getting rid of but haven’t.
Will I Have Enough?
       At Edward Jones, we believe there’s no magic number that applies to everyone when it comes to retirement. You’re an individual, not a math equation. Do you plan to work part-time, volunteer, travel, spend more time with the grandkids or simply take it easy? It’s probably a combination of these. But how much money you need to retire depends on what you want to do.