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Local artist takes you 15,000 feet for this Commissioning Week highlight

National Aquarium answers marine life SOS

As the South Riverkeeper, I am ­helping to make the river healthy for my children and yours

Every crab pot needs a turtle excluder

Goats are fuel-efficient lawn-care specialists

Since 1946, these Navy fliers have been delighting audiences with their aerial feats

Building a future marine and ­maritime workforce

Finding a boat to steal your heart has always been easy in Chesapeake Country. Finding a new generation to build, run and repair those watercraft — and to master the science of water — that’s harder.     “People started to ask, Who’s going to do this work? Where’s our work force for these jobs?” says Pam Ray, chair of the Eastport Yacht Club Foundation.     Enter the Marine and Maritime Career Fair for middle and high...

Will Tubman be the first woman on U.S. currency?

Harriet Tubman’s portrait will be in our hands and wallets, if Congressman Chris Van Hollen and the Dorchester County Council get their way. Both have asked federal Treasury Secretary Jack Lew to make the Maryland-born abolitionist the woman promised to be featured on the next new $10 bill.     Tubman “helped free hundreds of slaves through her courageous leadership,” Congressman Van Hollen wrote in a Black History Month letter to Secretary Lew. “She was...

It doesn’t look like the Severn River will meet its federal water quality cleanup goals by EPA’s interim deadline in 2017.     The Severn River’s No. 1 pollution threat is from stormwater runoff, which dumps nitrogen and sediment pollution in the river after storm events. Major sources of stormwater runoff are impervious surfaces such as roads, roofs, patios, driveways, graveled areas, parking lots etc.     The Severn watershed is also under...

Eventually, we get big things done

I love the fell swoop. If I paint a room, I want it finished before bedtime. If I find a shrub in the wrong place, I grab the shovel. Got a story idea? I want it now. Done in a day — a week here at Bay ­Weekly — is the hallmark of journalism.     I wish that more things dried as quickly as paint. Or flowed as fast as words.     I can say that now, but I’ve put decades into achieving fluency. Humble that we are, journalists substitute fluency...

Yellow perch break winter’s fast

Things are looking up for Maryland anglers when the first runs of yellow perch are reported. Also called ring perch, neds or yellow neds, they are the first Tidewater fish to respond to spawning urges. Leaving their wintering grounds, they will now break up into small schools and migrate toward fresher tributary headwaters to lay eggs and reproduce.     Waysons Corner where Rt. 4 crosses the Patuxent River is usually the place yellows first appear in our neck of the woods, and...

Put yourself in its place

Oh, the stories I’ve heard of abuse to cactus. I’ve spent many afternoons and evenings in plant clinics where people wheel in large barrel or drum cacti with decaying centers. Often water was oozing from the bottom where it had begun to rot. One elderly lady arrived in a chauffeured limousine. She sent the chauffeur inside to bring me out to examine her plant, a three-foot-tall Saguaro cactus. Before she would allow me to examine her cactus, she requested my credentials.  ...

11 minutes a year can really add up

The moon wanes through late-night and early-morning skies this week, reaching last quarter Tuesday. The moon rises Thursday around 9pm, with the bright star Spica trailing about 10 degrees behind. Far to the west of the moon is Jupiter, the next-brightest object. Friday night Spica rises ahead of the moon, but now the two are less than five degrees apart.     The moon rises just before midnight Sunday followed only minutes later by the red planet Mars, roughly five degrees to...

A Puritan family in the 1630s discovers harsher realities than nature

Cast out from their village for professing a stricter faith than their Puritan brethren, a lone family packs its worldly goods into a cart and rolls toward the deep, dark wood.     Father William (Ralph Ineson: Kingsman: The Secret Service) sees the banishment as proof of his superior faith. He welcomes hardship and torment, as they allow him to beg for God’s mercy. Mother Katherine (Kate Dickie: Take It Back and Start All Over) invests blind faith in God and husband....

December 27, 1937, is the day that equality came to Calvert County, thanks to school teacher Harriet ­Elizabeth Brown

Harriet Elizabeth Brown was a young woman of 30 when she challenged separate salary scales for black teachers. The year was 1937.     The Calvert County teacher’s attorney, Thurgood Marshall, was 29 when he represented her in the first Brown vs. Board of Education lawsuit. Together they laid the foundation for the Maryland Teachers Pay Equalization Law.     In 1939, federal courts ruled that determining the salaries of white and colored teachers solely on...

Born in the shadow of the Civil War, this African American community has grown and thrived

How did Parole get that odd name?     Today’s sprawling malls at Festival Plaza and the Annapolis Towne Center at Parole are built where once sprawled a Civil War prisoner of war camp, called Camp Parole because the prisoners had given their promise, their parole, not to escape.     Civilians came and started businesses to serve the military and the prisoners. Many were African Americans, building homes, churches, schools and a community of their own. Their...