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Your guide to Chesaeake Country's freshest produce and more!

Bay Weekly’s Labor Day parade of working people

Navy football coach Ken Niumatololo is already back to work for the new season

The closest you can get to World War II

Policy for success takes more than good luck

What kind of doublespeak is that?

New regional recommendations help ensure legal harvests

It’s good news for the Chesapeake Bay, which provides 75 percent of striped bass stocks that reside in the Atlantic. New recommendations by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission tackle the very real threat that commercial poaching poses to the fish’s sustainability. Past as ­Prologue     In 1985, the striped bass, or rockfish, population had collapsed due to over-fishing and environmental degradation. That led to a five-year moratorium on all harvesting...

It takes two species for fruit trees to blossom

A Bay Weekly reader complains that her apple trees have not produced any fruit during the five years that she has had them in her garden. All five, she told me, are of the same variety: golden delicious trees. She was told that for the trees to produce fruit, she needed to plant more than one tree. Since her preference was for Golden Delicious, that is what she purchased and planted. Help Bluebirds Help You     Bluebirds are great to have around the garden because they...

Look for the moon’s shadowy face on these shortest nights

The waning crescent moon heralds the coming sun in pre-dawn eastern skies through week’s end. So close to the sun’s glow, there’s more to this moon than meets the eye. While the crescent appears clearly aglow, the supposedly missing face appears as a dark notch. This is a result of earthshine, sunlight reflected off our planet that casts a shadowy glow over the rest of the moon’s visible face. This is not to be confused with seeing the dark side of the moon, which is...

Colonial Players explores what It took to make Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell’s publishing blockbuster Gone with the Wind became an iconic American film, but first a screenplay had to be written. Playwright Ron Hutchinson whimsically, hysterically and sometimes seriously turned the Hollywood lore of the scriptwriting into Moonlight and Magnolias, now playing at Colonial Players of Annapolis.     Three weeks into filming, without an acceptable script and slow production work by director George Cukor, producer David O. Selznick...

You’ll come away humming all the standard hits and ready to rent the classic film

Fiddler on the Roof, Broadway and Hollywood’s golden chestnut, is rich as rugelach, oozing joy and pathos. The tale of a Jewish village in Revolutionary Russia was destined for success in the hands of 2nd Star Productions, a troupe with a track record of musical triumphs. But Oy! God is not always so quick to grant his blessings. Such an ambitious enterprise demands more chutzpah from its 39 chosen people than was evident on opening night.     Surely you know the story:...

Sometimes, you might not want all the answers

If you could ask our creator one question, what would it be? Why do bad things happen to good people? What’s the meaning of it all? Why does Adam Sandler continue to get his movies green-lighted?     This thought exercise makes one big assumption: there will be answers.     In Prometheus, director Ridley Scott (Robin Hood) takes on the question of our origins —at least our origins in the Alien mythos.     Archeologists Dr. Elizabeth...

Two actors expand themselves into 15 ­characters in this Dignity Players performance

Stones in His Pockets, now at Dignity Players, has a wonderful premise: an American film crew comes back to the Irish town where The Quiet Man was filmed decades ago to make another movie. The return provides for a clash of cultures and nationalities, heightened by the incongruities of filmmaking and stereotypical star and fan behaviors.     Stones in His Pockets was written by Marie Jones, a writer celebrated in Ireland and the United Kingdom and deserving of greater American...

Would you walk 30 miles for the answer?

It won’t be the walkers who are sorest after Sunday, June 10’s two-day, 30-mile Chesapeake Challenge MS Walk. It will be the chalkers.     For the past several years, my husband, Jonathan Doherty and our 24-year-old daughter Ruth have chalked jokes and pictures along the route of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society’s annual fundraising walk on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. My husband and daughter started their chalking to help me go the distance. But when...

A Bay Weekly ­conversation with local author Mick Blackistone

Mick Blackistone has a name in Chesapeake Country.     Part of it came to him effortlessly, by the grace of inheritance.     Blackistone is a name of reckoning in Maryland history. Mick, 66, his twin brother, two older sisters and scads of cousins are the 14th generation to descend from Nathaniel Blackistone, colonist under Lord Baltimore’s land grant, who arrived in Maryland in the party of the Arc and Dove in 1634.     Mick’s own...

Bay Weekly’s movie reviewer joins prestigious Washington DC Area Film Critics Association

After what she calls a “long history of being a really annoying amateur film critic,” Bay Weekly’s own Diana Beechener is now a member of the Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association.     The Washington, D.C. Area Film Critics Association keeps its membership select with “stringent” criteria. Its critics must have history — at least 50 reviews in a year. Their publication must have scope: 50,000 readers a month for print.   ...