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U.S. Powerboat Show back to its former glory

I built the General Lee in less than a week — and raced it, too

Temptation awaits at the Boat Show

Great Schooner Race, Volvo Ocean Race set sail

Good neighbor provides trailside rest area

Keep him in the lab and out of my kitchen!

Buck moth caterpillars are interesting to look at, but don’t touch!
  Be careful where you step, especially around wooded areas and oaks.     My dog learned that lesson in her own backyard. She flipped up what resembled a miniature porcupine. Caterpillars that use their branching spines to fend off predators are not play toys for pets.     The buck moth caterpillar lives in oak forests from Florida to Maine. Buck moth also favor willows and wild cherry trees.     The caterpillars are covered in hollow spines attached to a...

Read on to find out 

The rod tip twitched, just a little and just once, but I caught the movement out of the corner of my eye.     “Hey Mo, you’ve got a bite,” I hissed, needlessly.     My friend’s hand had already moved to his reel and slipped off the clicker to reduce its resistance on the line. His thumb was on the spool, but he left the rod in its holder.     The rod tip twitched slightly again, then again. The line began to pull out, slowly at first,...
Gathering Garlic
I followed Bay Gardener Frank Gouin's advice about using compost and was rewarded. In the past, I was stingy about feeding my garlic and, come harvest, some of the bulbs weren’t much bigger than marbles. In November (a bit late), I planted German Porcelain, Musik, Spanish Roja and an Italian red variety in well-composted soil. On two or three occasions afterward I top-dressed with compost, digging in just a bit. In mid-June, I snipped off the flowers when the scapes bent over and...
Now’s the time for Brussels’ sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage
  The vegetable gardening season should not end with sweet corn and tomatoes. There is plenty of good gardening ahead, especially as temperatures cool. Last fall the Upakrik Farm garden produced a super abundance of peas and green beans until the first killing frost. We harvested broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, turnips and kohlrabi well after Thanksgiving and Brussels’ sprouts well after Christmas. The collard greens and kale were at their best nearly all winter long. We harvested...

There’s a lot to see in our galaxy

Venus is at its brightest in the east before dawn this week, reaching its greatest illuminated extent on the 12th, when it occupies the greatest chunk of celestial real estate as viewed from Earth. After that, the planet pulls away from us, dimming a bit but by no means losing its clear title as the brightest object in the sky other than sun and moon.     As a comparison, the next-brightest object, Jupiter, is just a few degrees above Venus. The waning crescent moon joins the picture...
Two drug dealers find out the Mexican cartel means business in this tale of sex, blood and marijuana
  Ben (Aaron Johnson: Albert Nobbs) and Chon (Taylor Kitsch: Battleship) are two California boys who made it big in a volatile market. No, they’re not investment bankers. This pair of best buds grows the greatest ganja in the world.      Ben is a brilliant botanist and businessman who believes in Buddhist philosophies and letting problems go. Chon is a former Navy SEAL who believes in beating any problem into a bloody pulp. With Chon in charge of the less savory parts...

Everyone’s a standout in The Talent Machine

  The Talent Machine Company brought back The Talent Machine — its namesake and the original 1988 show that helped to make children’s theater a summer staple in Annapolis — to St. John’s College just in time to provide relief from the heat.     The seven-to-14-year-old cast shared the message of the first show, launched by Bobbi Smith: With some talent, a lot of self-confidence and an enormous amount of work, you can make your dreams come true.  ...

The crabs are back and the corn’s ripe, so it’s time to feast

by Sandra Olivetti Martin and Dennis Doyle with Michelle Steel The Bay is crawling with crabs. Rivers and creeks, too. That’s the good news. We had more baby crabs this winter than have ever been counted in Maryland’s 22-year history of winter crab surveying.     Not so good: We’ll have to wait till fall to eat most of them. That’s when 500 million or so small crabs in our waters will reach eating size, 51⁄4 inches from point to point.  ...

If the bigger the better sets your standard for crab feasts, you’ll find happiness, crabs and company at three upcoming festivals, each a Maryland tradition.

Wednesday July 18: The 36th annual J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake in Crisfield, the crab capital of the world.     Devour all the steamed crabs, fried fish, clams, corn on the cob, sweet potato fries, onion rings you can. Wash it all down with endless water, soda or beer. Cap your feast with a juicy slice of watermelon. The feast honors former governor J. Millard Tawes and, during election years, brings in bushels of politicians as well as seafood. 12-4pm, Somers Cove...

Jones Station Severna Park Farmers Market celebrates 25 years

A sensory feast — colorful fruits and veggies, fresh eggs and meat, well-tended ornamental plants along with herbs and veggie plants — that’s the main reason to go to a farmers market. But education and the ability to speak directly with producers run a close second. At the Jones Station Farmers Market, education includes beekeeper and honey seller Peter Quinton’s display of what bees do to make honey and Lori Beard spinning wool roving into yarn.     If...