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That’s a question for Congressman Andy Harris

My model is good enough for the National Botanical Garden

We asked, and you delivered, with great nuptial photos and wedding day memories.

Plan ahead — and don’t sweat the small stuff

Experts in their field offer their help and services for your big day

It’s a big production

Please don’t crape murder it

I find crape myrtle 10 times more attractive than white birch trees, which we in New Hampshire consider a weed but Marylanders insist on trying to grow against the odds. It is a waste of time and money to plant white birch in southern Maryland because the summers are too hot and the winters do not provide sufficient cold to satisfy the tree’s dormancy needs. We have the ideal climate to grow crape myrtle, a tree (or shrub) that adds so much to any landscape.     Once a...

Help keep birds safe on power poles

All over Chesapeake Country, people are welcoming returning osprey. After traveling 1,800 to 4,600 miles, they’re ready to settle into just the right nest. Most return to an earlier nesting spot, but two-year-olds returning on their first northward migration have to go house-hunting.     Like channel markers, utility poles are favorite nesting spots, but they are not good choices since nests on power poles can both endanger the birds and cause power outages.  ...

This remake is doomed by its very concept; transforming the characters from cartoons into actual people kills the magic

The original it isn’t Belle (Emma Watson: Regression) is stifled in her provincial French town. She’s smart, progressive and inventive. The village is repressive, and the villagers mock her. Only the town meathead Gaston (Luke Evans: The Girl on the Train) seems to appreciate Belle, though she repeatedly rejects his offers of marriage.     Belle tries to lose herself in books. But when her father Maurice (Kevin Kline: Bob’s Burgers) is kidnapped by a...

Maryland Day: Our heritage, our legacy

How did you get here? Are you a ninth-generation Marylander, tracing your emigrating ancestors back to the Ark and the Dove? Or a first-generation transplant, here for new opportunity?     With a few indigenous exceptions, all of us Marylanders — regardless of how recent or how ancient — are immigrants, refugees, explorers or colonists.     This weekend, celebrate our shared stake in the territory and body politic planted 383 years ago on March 25,...

And how should we spell her name?

Anne Arundel is a name we know hereabouts — in one spelling or another. There’s Anne Arundel County, Arundel roads galore and the Ann Arrundell Historical Society, to name a few.     Behind the name is a woman, Anne Arundell, who lived in England about the same time as Shakespeare. The Arundel family name had its impact on us due to Anne’s 1628 marriage into the influential Calvert family.     Each variant spelling of her name is as good as the...

Due date gets earlier year by year

On the first day, he soars through the air in a rollercoaster dance, weaving the sky with his fish flight: the dance of courtship. On the second day, she is with him, perched comfortably in their solitary tower. The osprey have returned to Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary. This year’s return date was February 22.     Isn’t that early? Don’t osprey usually arrive after St. Patrick’s Day?     Not so, explains Greg Kearns, veteran naturalist at...

Time, not effort, yields top-notch results

We find corned beef at delis, restaurants and at this time of year in groceries ready to boil for St. Patrick’s Day. This year I made it at home.     Do-it-yourself corning is neither complex, expensive nor labor-intensive. The challenge is finding the right containers for curing and cooking the beef. And maybe finding the refrigerator space.     There is nothing magical about the brisket. The traditional weight is six to eight pounds, but the recipe is...

Whatever the weather, we want to know where Bay Weekly takes you

Seems like we’ve gone through a whole year since we last met here.     In weather ways, we have. Tuesday through Thursday in both the first two weeks of March brought spring warmth, with temperatures in the 60s and 70s. Last Thursday, March 9, was so warm we had to roll up our sleeves. March 14 brought ice. Now we’re back where we should have been in February, except that nine of that short month’s 28 days anticipated spring with temperatures above 60. Don...

Hoe them out and bury them — or eat them

Winter weeds have loved mild winter we’ve been having. Annual bluegrass, cardamine, chickweed, henbit and mares-tale, to name a few, are twice the size they were this time last year. Unless you eradicate them now, they are likely to cover the ground by the time you’re ready for planting. They may already be flowering and producing an abundance of seeds.     Attack them without chemicals with a hoe or pull them out of the ground. Then collect them and bury them deep...

White perch make good sport and better eating

March brings a springtime treasure that almost makes up for its treacherous weather: white perch. These tasty fish have just begun to show up in the creeks, though the winter storm that tormented the Northeast coast might delay the bulk of their numbers.     A close cousin of the striped bass, white perch (Marone americana) are the most numerous fish in the Tidewater as well as the species most often caught by recreational anglers. They can reach 18 inches in length, but due to...