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Your guide to Chesaeake Country's freshest produce and more!

Today’s oysterman is likely to be a woman — and a farmer rather than a hunter-gatherer

Local artist Greg Harlin puts his stamp on the Battle of Baltimore

Species at risk in Maryland are a roll call of birds we know and love

No walk in the park in Chesapeake Country

Mountain laurel, blueberries and other acid-lovers, too

You never know what’s going to happen on the Chesapeake

Look for the thunder

As the sun sets in the northwest at 8:31 Friday, July’s full moon rises in the southeast. Native American and folk lore call this the Thunder Moon, the Hay Moon and the Buck Moon. We’re all familiar with this moon’s strong, mid-summer storms, and farmers still begin their harvest of winter livestock feed at this time.     But even with the explosion in the deer population, the Buck Moon is more obscure. But this is the time when male deer regrow their antlers...

Three friends prove the best revenge makes for great comedy

Everyone has had a moment of wanting to kill the boss. Maybe it’s a fleeting thought after a bad meeting or a constant daydream in a hostile work environment. Either way, typically, calmer heads prevail and no lives are lost.     In Horrible Bosses, calmer heads don’t prevail, and it’s pretty damn funny.     The film follows three buddies who each have nightmare bosses. Nick (Jason Bateman: Paul) has been working for eight years for Dave Harken...

A silly old bear and his buddies prove you don’t need 3D to make great animation

Since Walt Disney last visited the Hundred Acre Woods, animation has seen the advent of 3D, computer rendering and gross-out humor. This no-frills revisit to the classic story of Winnie the Pooh is a return to hand-drawn animation.     The story is so simple that even the youngest can play along: While on a search for a replacement tail for Eeyore, Pooh discovers a note from Christopher Robin. Soon Pooh and the rest of the Hundred Acre Woods crowd become convinced that their...
Dear Bay Weekly:     I try to pick up the paper whenever I’m in the area. I’ve always found it really easy to read and to look at.     I was patronizing the Marriot in Annapolis on a recent Friday night — not because I’m part of the young singles crowd but because my girlfriends wanted to go to Pussers.     Out front, I picked up a copy of Bay Weekly.     The next day we traveled to Chesapeake Beach to see...
Dear Bay Weekly:     I enjoyed your article on the cats meow http://bayweekly.com/articles/creature-features/article/weeks-creature-f.... Some years back I did cat rescue work with Linda Brown, a friend on the SPCA board. Together we neutered a lot of Eastport cats and found territories where they could be looked after. A network of residents around the city provided  health care services  for street cats out of their own pockets.     Eastport is a...

You’ll find good news aplenty in this week’s paper — and some bright spots in the classifieds, too

Editor and publisher Sandra Olivetti Martin, vacationing with husband and Bay Weekly co-founder Bill Lambrecht, both of whom celebrate birthdays within a week of the year’s mid-point, asked for a week off from her usual letter. So I write you in her stead, aquake at the responsibility of filling this coveted space.     As a reader of the paper, you perhaps know me best for the weekly astronomy column, Sky Watch, that I pen. A fixture since Day 1, the idea was based on...

Natural Resources Police officer and historian Lt. Gregory Bartles brings home “the Holy Grail of Department of Natural Resources history”

Before it sat for many years at a gas station near Baltimore ... Before it stood guard in front of an American Legion hall ... Before it was a yard ornament for the inventor of Bromo-Seltzer ... And before it battled 19th century pirates in the Chesapeake, the Dahlgren 12-pound Light Boat Howitzer was born in the heart of Confederacy at the Tredegar Iron Works in Richmond, Virginia.     After a circuitous journey lasting 143 years, the cannon came home this year to the...

Mixing rock, country and comedy to feed Bubbles and Squeak

For a quarter-century, music fed Calvert Marine Museum’s otters and salaried its staff.          In service of the museum’s twin causes of local history and science, Los Lobos howled, Crosby Stills and Nash harmonized, Bob Dylan growled and the Allman Brothers jammed.     Calvert brought Southern Maryland the big names of rock and country music, and if some of them were slightly off their prime, the fans didn’t care. The classics...
America’s No. 1 animal rights advocate joins state activists to celebrate a landmark legislative year It has been a very good year to be an animal in Maryland. Propelled by the volunteer organization Maryland Votes for Animals and bi-partisan support, five animal protection bills became law in 2011.     “This year was unprecedented,” says Carolyn Kilborn, founder and chair of Maryland Votes for Animals.     It’s about time. The national...

Kids are totally invested in the story, and the script is so packed with hyperbole that it transcends caricatures to entertain the adults as well

Will Bartlett’s one-hour musical adaptation of Rumplestiltskin has run continuously off-Broadway since 1985 with good reason. It does a nice job of distilling a long and complex children’s classic with a warped message into an entertaining and concise plot with a healthy moral. And this summer, lucky little Naptowners need travel only as far as West Street to see it.     The traditional Rumplestiltskin tale is creepy. Because of her father’s drunken boasting, a...