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Your guide to Chesaeake Country's freshest produce and more!

Bay Weekly’s Labor Day parade of working people

Navy football coach Ken Niumatololo is already back to work for the new season

The closest you can get to World War II

Policy for success takes more than good luck

What kind of doublespeak is that?

Anne Arundel County     Arundel Olympic Swim Center - Swim lessons for adults and kids. Children must be a least three years old and potty-trained: 410-222-7933.     Truxton Park Swimming Pool - A variety of swimming programs for adults and children: 410-263-2958.     North Arundel Aquatic Center - Swim lessons for adults and kids. Children must be a least three years old and potty-trained: 410-222-0900.     Severna Park Swim...

This contemporary cousin to Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf debates the value of compassion and the ethics of art.

The shape of things (written in lower-case by playwright Neil Labute) intends to raise questions about art, its role in life and the value of the creative methods. Honesty, kindness and truth seem to be of lesser concern.     Art student Evelyn meets Adam, a nerdy museum guard. As their relationship grows she begins to change him in emotional and physical ways (trendier clothing, contact lenses, a nose job, lost weight and stepping away from other long-time friendships, all at...

The lessons of fathers giving away their daughters in marriage — and bringing them into the business

June’s not only for brides; it’s also the month for fathers of the brides. The time I’ve spent with both in recent days has advanced my thinking on both. And just in time for Father’s Day.     When I imagined Dad and the Family Business, this week’s story for the paternal occasion, I didn’t go looking for father-daughter partnerships. Yet that’s what I found. Fathers with daughters following in their footsteps. Of the seven children in...

Hopping Scum Frogs over lily pads for bass and bluegill

We eased the canoe quietly up to within comfortable fly-casting distance of the shaded shoreline. A sparse blanket of fallen petals and pollen covered most of the water’s surface along this wooded edge. But I hoped the bluegills holding there could tell the difference between floating foliage and a tasty beetle. Fishfinder     Go Eastern side if you want a chance at rockfish, the farther south the better. No one is sure quite what has driven the fish off the Western...
If you are watering your lawn and garden with an overhead sprinkler during daylight hours, you are wasting water. Especially from 11am and 4pm, between 10 and 20 percent of the water you apply by over-head sprinkler is lost to evaporation. Plant Now     Looking for something to grow in the garden this summer now that the peas, cabbage, broccoli, kohlrabi and cauliflower are harvested? Consider growing Swiss chard, summertime lettuce and okra. Swiss chard is a great substitute...

Hidden amid the year’s shortest night, the sky beckons

With days upon days of scorching weather already, you might be surprised that summer begins only this week, on June 21, with the summer solstice. On this day, the sun reaches its farthest point north in the sky, 231⁄2 degrees north of the equator directly over the Tropic of Cancer. That morning the sun rises at 5:40 and sets 14 hours, 55 minutes later at 8:35.     Although summer solstice does indeed provide us with the most daylight of the year, it is by no means the...

In this follow-up, the guys travel to exotic Thailand for Stu’s wedding, and what happens in Bangkok can be imagined.

There’s a big joke in this movie somewhere, but I can’t tell you what or where it is. Perhaps it’s the serious raunchiness that pervades. Maybe the producers of II made a ton of money from I, so they figured, What the heck, they laughed once, they’ll laugh again.     If you’ve seen the first Hangover, you’ll have context for the present action. It’s now two years after the Las Vegas venture in Hangover I, and another of the four buddies...

Volunteer birders stalked their prey for five years to create the new Atlas of Breeding Birds in Maryland

New osprey heads are popping over edges of nests all over Chesapeake Country. Puffs of tiny brown Carolina wren fledglings erupt from our porches and shrubs, the second brood since April. Soon, beneath our feeders, cardinal babies, whose sprouts of downy feathers remind us of our own bad-hair days, will beg for food from their parents.     Evidence of nesting is easy to find when the birds hop about our doorsteps. But most of Maryland and D.C.’s 206 species of breeding...

Severna Park High journalist wins Scholarship for Scholars award

Call it luck, or call it a nose for news: a journalist’s ability to sense a good story. Whatever you call it, Katie Blunt has it, and it’s taking her to college in North Carolina.     The Severna Park High School senior was in class, watching a documentary on the Lost Boys, when a visiting teacher noted that a group of these Sudani refugees lived on his street.     That’s when Blunt’s journalism instincts kicked in. She asked the teacher...

The South County Senior ShowStoppers prove that ambition isn’t a young person’s game

The South County Senior ShowStoppers want you to know they’re more than just belly dancers. Shimmying seniors on Social Security may be what gets the variety troupe noticed, but this diverse bunch has more than swiveling hips to recommend them. The troupe has earned the Governor’s Leadership in Aging Award for Performing Arts, recognizing outstanding contributions to quality of life and the field of aging.     “People are pleasantly surprised at the level of...