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Good — and sometimes great — fishing in a cleaner Bay

One of America’s wryest philosophers, Yogi Berra, once noted that predictions were difficult to make, especially about the future. Despite his sage warning, I feel compelled to make some Tidewater prophecies for the New Year.  Fish Are Biting At last! A slight warming spell has freed many of the ice-bound tributaries, and the pickerel and perch are on the move. Lip-hooked minnows on a shad dart under a bobber will tempt them and relieve your winter doldrums — at least until...
Dear Bay Weekly: When my Mom, Margaret Asquith, passed away, her dog, Katie, remained with my husband Don and me. Although 14 years old, with hearing and vision issues, Katie could still run like a pony and had her own mind about things. But one morning in the predawn darkness, Katie disappeared. Panic quickly set in and the search began on foot and by car. After reporting her missing on the County Animal Control website, I was contacted by Anne Wills of www.DogsFindingDogs.com. In addition to...
Dear Bay Weekly: My philosophy from high school was based on the lines in the A.E. Houseman poem, Therefore, since the world has still Much good, but much less good than ill, And while the sun and moon endure, Luck’s a chance but trouble’s sure, I’d face it as a wise man would, And train for ill and not for good. A kid I went to high school with, P.F. Kluge, now a well-known writer (Edie and the Cruisers; The Big Elvis), wrote over his picture in my yearbook, “Don’...

A speech impediment proves to be a royal pain in this excellent drama

At the close of the 1925 Empire Exhibition, England’s Duke of York Albert (Colin Firth: A Single Man) stands before a live audience for his radio broadcast debut. Instead of a refined address, the Duke broadcasts a halting stuttering address as his countrymen regard him in horror.  This is the next in a long line of humiliations for Albert — called B-b-b-bertie by his family — who chokes on marbles and smokes heavily under doctor’s orders in attempts to cure his...

It still holds gifts for flowers and birds

If you planted pansies in your garden last fall, use branches of your discarded Christmas tree to provide the plants with some winter protection. Cutting the branches near the stem and spreading a single layer over the pansies will provide light shade, thus reducing chances of winter injury if we don’t get sufficient snow. Next spring, remove the branches just as the plants resume growing. Pansies are winter-hardy, but providing them with light winter shade will improve their spring color...

We asked you to choose your favorites of 2010. Here’s how your votes tallied.

Standing out as the Best of the Bay is no accident. Championship is essential, but it’s not enough.In a competition so wide, to stand out you’ve got to be a champion in your field — whether that field is Best Restaurant, Best Cheap Date, Best Place to People Watch or Best Place to Pick up Bay Weekly.  Just as important is the chemistry you spark with the voters, for it’s got to making energy to get out the vote — make that many votes — in your favor....

While Old Sol is seven percent stronger this week, it’s unlikely you’ll need to break out the sunscreen

While we commonly mark the first week of January as the commencement of the new year, it also marks two significant milestones in the passage of the earth’s journey around the sun. You wouldn’t know it by winter’s chilly grip, but January 4 marks perihelion, earth’s closest approach to the sun. On this day, 92.187 million miles separate us from the sun, compared to aphelion, around July 4 each year, when the two are 93.375 million miles apart. Sunlight hitting the earth...

To get what we want in our lives, we must choose the right goals

The New Year’s commitment to self-improvement through resolutions is widely viewed with cynicism, in part because New Year’s resolutions go so notoriously unmet. After years of excitedly committing to a new goal — only to abandon the quest by March — it’s easy to conclude that New Year’s resolutions are an exercise in futility.  But this attitude is false and self-destructive. Making New Year’s resolutions does not have to be futile. Done seriously...

Vol. xviii, No 52 brings you The Best of the Bay

For a few moments this time of year, it’s possible to escape into weightless time. The Christmas Express has arrived and gone, so you no longer need to keep up to speed. 2010, that admirably round year, has nearly run its course. But not quite. Now’s the time to wrap up old projects. Now’s the time to call the roll of the past year, look at what we’ve achieved — and conceive our hopes for the new year. In that reflective spirit, Bay Weekly’s last issue of the...

A teenage girl spurs eccentric lawmen in a manhunt for her father’s killer in this sharp remake of a western classic.

Mattie Ross (Hailee Steinfeld in her feature debut) is a quick-witted and willful 14-year-old girl, come to the end of the railroad line in some dusty Arkansas town to collect her dear departed father. But she’s more interested in collecting Tom Chaney (Josh Brolin: Jonah Hex), the cur who killed him, and seeing the murderer hanged. By barter, wit and resolve she recruits crusty marshall Rooster Cogburn (Jeff Bridges: Tron: Legacy) and ornamented Texas Ranger LaBoeuf (Matt Damon:...