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Your guide to Chesaeake Country's freshest produce and more!

Today’s oysterman is likely to be a woman — and a farmer rather than a hunter-gatherer

Local artist Greg Harlin puts his stamp on the Battle of Baltimore

Species at risk in Maryland are a roll call of birds we know and love

No walk in the park in Chesapeake Country

Mountain laurel, blueberries and other acid-lovers, too

You never know what’s going to happen on the Chesapeake

-We welcome your opinions and letters – with name and address. We will edit when necessary. Include your name, address and phone number for verification. Mail them to Bay Weekly, 1629 Forest Drive, Annapolis, MD 21403 •E-mail them to editor@bayweekly.com. or submit your letters on-line by clicking here.

  Russell Got It Right (Except the White Hair) Dear Bay Weekly: I think Amy Russell’s article on me [“A Time to Reap, A Time to Sow”: May 13] turned out very nicely! Or at least, I did after I got over my shock at seeing all that white hair in the cover photo. And the timing was certainly perfect. I had a very successful open house this past weekend — parking even got to be a problem — and most of the customers said they’d come because they saw the...

A little boy gives you a big chance to fight childhood cancer

  Luca Assante will be three years old on June 20. He and his two sisters, Isabella and Gabriella, live with their parents Lucy and Vinnie in Annapolis, not too far away from Grandpa Ray and Grandma Geraldine. Or from Lucy’s sister and her kids. Aunt Maria and Uncle Sal live in Dunkirk. The other dozens of aunts, uncles and cousins are spread out, many in Italy. They are part of a large, loving family, a family that understands the need to stick together. Especially for the children...

After nine years, Don Hooker compiles the Bay Blues Festival’s greatest hits and biggest catastrophes

  If there ain’t pain, there ain’t the blues. Chesapeake Bay Blues Festival CEO Don Hooker knows this fact intimately. It took a painful lot of work and more than a little suffering on the side for Hooker to turn his charitable idea into a juggernaut fundraiser. Looking back at nine years of festivals, Hooker talks about the logistics, lunacy and love of music that have sustained him and the festival for nearly a decade.   Track 1: History Repeating Since founding the...

But thanks to sycamore anthracnose, they are suffering and won’t fill out until this summer

  During the past weeks, a number of Bay Weekly readers have expressed concern that something is killing the sycamore trees in their yards and in forests. The defoliation and the dead leaves that are dropping to the ground are due to a disease called sycamore anthracnose. This disease occurs only when we have a cold, wet spring like this year. The fungus that causes this disease attacks the newly emerging growth at the tips of the branches. Just as the first young leaves begin to mature,...

How are you planning on celebrating?

  Have you encountered any American bison lately on the Maryland range? Such a sighting would have been more likely had you been around a few hundred years ago. Like gray wolves, wild bison have been pushed out of Maryland. People did the pushing, people who believed this land was made for you and me.   I note this extirpation because this is a big week for rare, threatened and endangered species. Upcoming are Endangered Species Day, on May 21; International Day for Biological...

The Blue Angels’ support plane, Fat Albert, has a few tricks up its wings

  -“The current temperature is about 65 degrees with clear skies. The wind is calm,” Captain Edward Jorge, aircraft commander, tells his crew as he starts the pre-flight brief just minutes before his plane, Fat Albert, starts the Blue Angels’ show. The six-man crew hangs on to Eddie’s every word, digesting the information, with stone-cold focused faces and the occasional nod. Wind speeds, coordinates and the course are detailed too rapidly for a civilian to catch,...
  Have you ever found a hummingbird’s nest? More precisely, a hummingbird’s nest perched atop a clothespin? An Anna hummingbird found the perfect abode on a California clothesline. It’s an incorrect assumption that birds nest only in trees and hedgerows and similar places. In reality, if it doesn’t move — or seldom does — it’s a possible site for a nest. Like flower baskets, old boots and abandoned teacups. Or basketball hoops, mailboxes and...

So I was wrong about the Jonah

  The Bay was calm, the sun was shining and we were relaxed. It was early afternoon and Mike E. and I, anchored in 35 feet of water, had six light-tackle rods rigged with cut, fresh menhaden and set out in rod holders. The closest fishing boat to us was about a mile away.  The slick from a block of ground menhaden, submerged in a net bag astern, had spread out well behind us, and Mike was occasionally adding to it a few chunks of fresh menhaden as he prepared additional baits. Usually...

All those phases are just figments of our own perception

  May’s full moon rises at 8:22 Thursday in the southeast just as the sun sets in the northwest. It travels a low, shallow arc through southern skies, finally setting in the southwest just as the sun crests the northeast horizon at 5:44. With spring fully abloom, this is known as the Flower Moon, the Corn Planting Moon and the Milk Moon. Over the ages we have given the moon its many folksy names to describe the seasons here on Earth. Of course, it’s always the same old moon....
  Week 9: The Season of Sitting Olivia continues her perseverance. Oliver continues his vigilance. He visits her often and sits at her side and brings her fish to eat. Livie stands up every so often to rearrange the eggs so that they are uniformly heated and to stretch her wings. And the long days continue. We had high winds on Sunday. Oliver could not stay on the nest with Olivia, or even on any nearby piling. But Livie stayed scrunched down deep in her nest, not even eating until evening...