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The very thirsty Silvery Checkerspot

Summer after summer, you’d hear of some unlucky swimmer, waterman or shellfish eater. Then it happened to me

It makes no nitrogen to spare

  A few weeks back (June 3), we talked about how to grow a clover lawn. There are advantages to clover, but feeding the grass isn’t one of them. It’s true that clover is a legume, and it fixes its own nitrogen from Earth’s atmosphere. But clover won’t fertilize the lawn where it’s growing.  The nitrogen that clover fixes is totally utilized by the clover plant and is not released into the soil unless the clover plant is killed. Only after the nitrogen has...

The Patuxent is hungry for your love

  Do you love a river? We’ve all got good reason to. Rivers wrote the American story. This land was penetrated, mapped and settled on the backs of rivers. You crossed an ocean so full of peril that the old maps told no lies in populating the big waters with sea monsters. You bumped ashore on some care-worn ship and began scratching out a living in the hard dirt. When you were ready to pick up and move farther inland, seeking something better, you rode a river. The ride wasn’t...

The Patuxent is hungry for your love

  Do you love a river? We’ve all got good reason to. Rivers wrote the American story. This land was penetrated, mapped and settled on the backs of rivers. You crossed an ocean so full of peril that the old maps told no lies in populating the big waters with sea monsters. You bumped ashore on some care-worn ship and began scratching out a living in the hard dirt. When you were ready to pick up and move farther inland, seeking something better, you rode a river. The ride wasn’t...

Brown pelicans arrive after wintering on the Gulf Coast

  The brown pelican, Pelicanus occidentalis, is the state bird of Louisiana. Worldwide, there are six species of pelican. Two species, the white and the brown, are native to the U.S. The brown is the smallest of all; Atlantic browns are even smaller than the ones in the Pacific. Still they are large and with their huge bill, unmistakable. For years, brown pelicans were not to be seen on the Chesapeake — or anywhere. From the late 1950s until the mid 1980s, the brown pelican...

Calvert Marine Museum’s snakehead settles into life in solitary confinement

  Two years ago, the Calvert Marine Museum put a new inmate in the tank, a snakehead fish, as the showpiece of the museum’s invasive species exhibit. “It was a good example because there was a lot of press on it a few years back,” says Ken Kaumeyer, the museum’s curator of estuarine biology. Though the fish hasn’t attempted a jailbreak, Kaumeyer isn’t ready to declare it a model prisoner. Originally, the snakehead was to be part of a larger exhibit,...

Week 16: Junior Thrives

  There is only one baby osprey this year, Olivia usually has three each year, but she has been having her trials of late. Last year, she lost all her babies when a windstorm toppled the nest into the water and the chicks drowned. This year, some sort of mishap occurred with her initial eggs. Junior is growing by leaps and bounds and is well attended by his parents. I see his little tousled head poking up above the nest every day now as his mother feeds him fresh-caught fish. When he...

-We welcome your opinions and letters – with name and address. We will edit when necessary. Include your name, address and phone number for verification. Mail them to Bay Weekly, 1629 Forest Drive, Annapolis, MD 21403 •E-mail them to editor@bayweekly.com. or submit your letters on-line by clicking here.

  Another Member of the Osprey Fan Club Dear Bay Weekly: I wanted to let you know how much I enjoy reading the weekly Osprey Saga by Michael Koblos. These are amazing birds. –Peg Richardson, Lusby   Loving Rivers Dear Bay Weekly: Thank you for the excellent June 24 editorial, “Love a River,” reminding us of the role of our rivers and our history, followed by the feature about mapmaker Dave Linthicum’s passion for the Patuxent. What better time than summer to...

Bay Weekly’s 2010 Summer Book Guide

  Ahhhh, summer. The season synonymous with vacation: that hard-earned leisure time when we finally give ourselves permission to retreat and, for a short respite, do nothing. Or, at least, do very little. Wherever your retreat — a sandy beach, a cool blue pool, fresh pine-scented mountains or as far as your backyard hammock in the shade of the big old oak tree — it’s better with a good book. Bay Weekly’s 2010 Summer Book Guide helps you pick the right book. To start...

With more books and more formats than ever, only time stands in your way

  My husband worries that you’re not reading books. He worries because he’d like to be writing books. As a Washington newspaper correspondent, he’s an endangered species because everybody knows you’re reading fewer newspapers — and shorter stories — though not less news. So here he is in the age of tweets, with many more words still in his computer. Books are his hope of last resort — if only you’ll read them. But you’re not, according...

Rod maker George Pavlik had agonized over this rod —
the perfect stick for casting to white perch

  My skiff had drifted a good distance from the cove’s rip-rapped edge by the time I glimpsed the slight flash. It was the gold/green hue of a big white perch, deep and near the rocks. Arcing my spinner bait out over the growing distance, I got it close to the mark.  - I gave the lure just a second or two to get down, then started to crank. The fish must have hit it on the drop, because I was immediately solid. It felt like a good one. Playing it gently, I kept a good bend in...