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Six new reasons to give thanks for too much turkey

Whole Foods French wine & cheese tasting raises palates to new levels

Recipes for humans and other fanciers

A beautifully staged and wonderfully acted ­communications breakdown

At Thanksgiving, this year’s garden continues giving

A fat eel is the best winter bait

But thanks to sycamore anthracnose, they are suffering and won’t fill out until this summer

  During the past weeks, a number of Bay Weekly readers have expressed concern that something is killing the sycamore trees in their yards and in forests. The defoliation and the dead leaves that are dropping to the ground are due to a disease called sycamore anthracnose. This disease occurs only when we have a cold, wet spring like this year. The fungus that causes this disease attacks the newly emerging growth at the tips of the branches. Just as the first young leaves begin to mature,...

How are you planning on celebrating?

  Have you encountered any American bison lately on the Maryland range? Such a sighting would have been more likely had you been around a few hundred years ago. Like gray wolves, wild bison have been pushed out of Maryland. People did the pushing, people who believed this land was made for you and me.   I note this extirpation because this is a big week for rare, threatened and endangered species. Upcoming are Endangered Species Day, on May 21; International Day for Biological...

The Blue Angels’ support plane, Fat Albert, has a few tricks up its wings

  -“The current temperature is about 65 degrees with clear skies. The wind is calm,” Captain Edward Jorge, aircraft commander, tells his crew as he starts the pre-flight brief just minutes before his plane, Fat Albert, starts the Blue Angels’ show. The six-man crew hangs on to Eddie’s every word, digesting the information, with stone-cold focused faces and the occasional nod. Wind speeds, coordinates and the course are detailed too rapidly for a civilian to catch,...
  Have you ever found a hummingbird’s nest? More precisely, a hummingbird’s nest perched atop a clothespin? An Anna hummingbird found the perfect abode on a California clothesline. It’s an incorrect assumption that birds nest only in trees and hedgerows and similar places. In reality, if it doesn’t move — or seldom does — it’s a possible site for a nest. Like flower baskets, old boots and abandoned teacups. Or basketball hoops, mailboxes and...

So I was wrong about the Jonah

  The Bay was calm, the sun was shining and we were relaxed. It was early afternoon and Mike E. and I, anchored in 35 feet of water, had six light-tackle rods rigged with cut, fresh menhaden and set out in rod holders. The closest fishing boat to us was about a mile away.  The slick from a block of ground menhaden, submerged in a net bag astern, had spread out well behind us, and Mike was occasionally adding to it a few chunks of fresh menhaden as he prepared additional baits. Usually...

All those phases are just figments of our own perception

  May’s full moon rises at 8:22 Thursday in the southeast just as the sun sets in the northwest. It travels a low, shallow arc through southern skies, finally setting in the southwest just as the sun crests the northeast horizon at 5:44. With spring fully abloom, this is known as the Flower Moon, the Corn Planting Moon and the Milk Moon. Over the ages we have given the moon its many folksy names to describe the seasons here on Earth. Of course, it’s always the same old moon....
  Week 9: The Season of Sitting Olivia continues her perseverance. Oliver continues his vigilance. He visits her often and sits at her side and brings her fish to eat. Livie stands up every so often to rearrange the eggs so that they are uniformly heated and to stretch her wings. And the long days continue. We had high winds on Sunday. Oliver could not stay on the nest with Olivia, or even on any nearby piling. But Livie stayed scrunched down deep in her nest, not even eating until evening...

-We welcome your opinions and letters – with name and address. We will edit when necessary. Include your name, address and phone number for verification. Mail them to Bay Weekly, 1629 Forest Drive, Annapolis, MD 21403 •E-mail them to editor@bayweekly.com. or submit your letters on-line by clicking here.

  Where Is the Osprey Saga? Dear Bay Weekly: I am distressed. May 20 is the second week that Michael Koblos’ saga of Oliver and Olivia Osprey has not appeared in Bay Weekly. I have been following the story of this osprey family through the author’s firsthand observations. Mr. Koblos’ writing has provided insights into the life of these great sea birds of prey. Please continue this delightful saga without interruption. –Terry Morr, Solomons Editor’s reply: To...

Olde Severna Park turns a brighter shade of green

  When heavy rain falls from the sky, a deluge of water floods into Chesapeake Bay, carrying anything it soaks up on the way. In Olde Severna Park, neighbors are strategizing to keep their lawn fertilizers, nitrogen and chemicals out of the Bay. “We’re starting a rain garden as part of a stormwater project,” says Ann Jackson, who’s lived in Olde Severna Park for 16 years and does her homework on how to keep her charming, leafy waterside community Bay-friendly....

How One Bayside Community Tries to Balance Green Value with Coastal Preservation in the 21st Century

  Every Chesapeake neighborhood has its own way of looking at the water. Each is just as unique in how it lives with the Bay and its tributaries. One way or another, communities along about a third of Maryland’s 4,360 miles of tidal shoreline must manage erosion to keep their waterfronts. At the extreme, in neighborhoods on Calvert County’s prehistoric clay cliffs, erosion brings homes ever closer to the edge. Yet holding back the tide means destroying the habitat of the...