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Find help here for all your fall projects

Flowers, Vegetables and Grasses for Fall and Winter

Here’s the help you need to tackle fall’s long must-do list

How to freeze your rockfish

A season’s worth of sitcom plots in two hours

Plan your trip at www.visitmaryland.org/map

With many summer days to fill, do you ponder what to do, where to go? There is a lot to do in Maryland, with guidance now just a point and click away. Find your way to www.visitmaryland.org/map and the rest is easy. Unveiled by Governor Martin O’Malley, the Visit Maryland Interactive Map presents Maryland’s collection of natural, cultural, heritage and recreational resources in a user-friendly format. Choose an area or destination, move the cursor over the icon and click. Up pops a...

More trees mean better water

  Once upon a time, the land surrounding Rockhold Creek’s headwaters in Southern Anne Arundel County was densely wooded. Over generations, the land was cleared for agriculture and pasture. This fall, that land will begin the return to its roots with the planting of 12,000 new trees. The path to the reforestation project was cleared by recent legislation requested by County Executive John R. Leopold that eliminates a restriction on the use of reforestation money paid by developers....

Within the Order of the Eastern Star, jewelry store owner Jean Chance wields power to do good

  For 40 years, Jean Chance has been the grand dame of W. R. Chance Jewelers on Main Street, Annapolis, the family business started by her husband’s father more than 60 years ago. Now, she’s gained a grander title: Worthy Grand Dame of the Grand Chapter of Maryland Order of the Eastern Star. The Order of the Eastern Star is a tradition from her side of the family; her grandparents, father, aunts and uncles all belonged to the fraternal organization now numbering one million...

Musicians Carolyn Surrick, Ginger Hildebrand
and Sue Richards perform to soothe wounded warriors

  Before we go inside, viola da gamba player Carolyn Surrick touches my arm. With serious eyes and concern in her voice, she lays out the facts: Most of the people I’m about to see have been injured horribly. On some, the scars will be invisible; on others, all too visible.  Her message is implicit: Don’t freak out. She tells me this not for my benefit but for the benefit of her audience, the residents of Walter Reed’s Mologne House, where she and sister Ensemble...

The spate of Code Orange days have our plants gasping for breath

  A Bay Weekly reader asked me why his Heritage birch was dropping its leaves despite the fact that it was under irrigation. The answer was simple: air pollution. The Heritage birch is a clone of river birch, and river birch trees are extremely sensitive to ozone and sulfur dioxide. Since the middle of June, we have experienced several days of Code Orange, and in early July we have also experienced Code Red. This means that air pollutants are sufficiently high to affect humans, and the...

Yard signs make your first introduction to many candidates

  You may not agree with me in welcoming political signs as a sign of the arriving season. I can’t claim to love political signs quite the way I do spring’s greening or autumn’s gilding, but I do relish the spice of seasonal change — even electoral season. I like political signs for other reasons, too. They’re news, another thing I love. Yard signs make our first introduction to many candidates. Even in the age of the Internet, signs often go up before press...

Safely stashed in the doomsday vault are a diversity of seeds from New Mexico’s most well-known food group

  Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin may not be a diehard fan of the spicy group, but he headed north for Svalbard, Norway, as part of its entourage. No, not the funk-rock band Red Hot Chili Peppers, though that would make an interesting story of a different variety. Cardin joined six congressional colleagues to deliver the seeds of American-grown chili peppers — the kind that spice up food, not concert stages — to the Svalbard Global Seed Vault. Managed and run by the Global Crop...

A gathering of these thick-bodied fish will fill your cooler and make a memorable dinner

  My memory of big white perch begins on the Eastern Shore. I was fishing out of Crisfield in the early 1970s with the first fly-fishing guide on the Chesapeake, Doug Carson. I had looped out a long cast with a small, white marabou streamer to a sunken rock jetty off Janes Island and had come tight with what I assumed was a rowdy schoolie rock.  As I fought it near the boat, Doug reached over, grabbed my leader and flipped the chunky devil into the skiff remarking, “Nice black...

July’s Thunder Moon deadens all but the brightest lights

  The gibbous moon waxes through southern skies this week, becoming full on the 25th. July’s full moon is known as the Hay Moon or the Thunder Moon. Rising at dusk and setting at dawn, the full moon dominates the sky this week, blotting out all but the brightest planets and stars. As the sun sets in the northwest before 8:25 this week, the first light to appear is the evening star Venus, 20 degrees above the western horizon. As dusk gives way to darkness, Venus is joined by ruddy...

Week 19: On the Road to Independence

  A milestone has been reached. Junior is finally feeding himself. Now he can stuff himself with fish to his heart’s content and grow even faster. Here’s how it came about. After Oliver delivered the fish one morning, Olivia hunched over it and tore into it without feeding it to Junior. Then Olivia took off and flew circles and figure eights around the nest, swooping in close every once in a while. She was getting young Junior to feed himself of the pieces she had torn off,...