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Local artist takes you 15,000 feet for this Commissioning Week highlight

National Aquarium answers marine life SOS

As the South Riverkeeper, I am ­helping to make the river healthy for my children and yours

Every crab pot needs a turtle excluder

Goats are fuel-efficient lawn-care specialists

Since 1946, these Navy fliers have been delighting audiences with their aerial feats

Wellingtons, ties and ­double-barrel shotguns

We finally heard the sounds of the unseen men and dogs driving the game birds toward us, shouting and beating the thick brush off in the distance. In the midst of nine hunters strung out in a rough line some 200 yards right and left, I fingered the safety on my borrowed over-under 12-bore and tensed.     A few others working the hunt near the crest of the hill now began to wave large white flags to encourage the approaching game birds higher and faster.     Off...

Do your soil and yourself a favor; work easy

Don’t pull out those dead annual flowers; hit them down with the lawnmower.     Don’t spade or rototill the flower garden, either, because you destroy precious organic matter and risk plow-pan, a compacted layer of soil formed by the plow or rototiller blade.  This compacted layer prevents roots from penetrating deeper into the soil and leads to poor drainage, thus making plants less drought-resistant.     I have not spaded or rototilled my...

Look to Taurus for Hyades, Pleiades

The stars of winter are gathering in the growing darkness, with Taurus rising in the east around 7pm. Its brightest star, Aldebaran, marks the bull’s eye. From there, look a few degrees higher for the Hyades star cluster, and from there look another 10 degrees up for the more renown Pleiades cluster. Orion trails the bull, rising around 8:30pm, followed by Pegasus. Far to the west, in a barren section of sky, is fall’s brightest star, Fomalhaut.     By dawn, Orion...

Chilean miners fight for survival in this stirring drama based on a true story

Before descending into the bowels of the earth, workers at the San Jose gold and copper mine pause before a shrine to pray for protection. They need help from a higher power as the mining companies place profit above safety.     Each time the miners enter the gaping maw, they know there is a chance they’ll never return.     When the mountain collapses after 100 years of mining, it’s no surprise. Thirty-three miners are trapped. A rock twice the size...

Eighth-grader Kelsey ­Cashman’s tops Anne Arundel Library’s makeFashion Showcase

When Kelsey Cashman walks her dog Declan on a cold dark, winter night, they’ll both be comfortable. Declan wears the long fur coat of a golden retreiver. His 13-year-old mistress is warm as just-popped toast in the heated cape that took the St. Mary’s School eight-grader to the top of the class in STEM fashion     Cashman won’t need a flashlight to light their way, for her blue herringbone self-warming cape is trimmed in LED lights.     Twenty...

Navy Captain Fred foote uses poetry to soothe the battle-scarred

Loader and gunner, brothers from boot camp days, they came in one platoon to the shock of war; daily they clung to each other for strength and grace — each promised to bring the other home once more. Now both return: two versions of amputee –from “Bonded,” by Fred Foote   As a draftable teen in the heat of the Vietnam War in 1970, poet Fred Foote was far from the battlefront. No bullets or blood, but he was facing a war of his own.     “I...

“Dump Dominion” banner unfurled by We Are Cove Point

A pair of Cove Point protestors dropped from the upper deck of Bank of America Stadium during Nov. 2’s Monday Night Football game. In the Charlotte, N.C., stadium, an anticipated sellout crowd of close to 75,000 people were on hand for third-quarter play between the Carolina Panthers and the Indianapolis Colts.     Based on recent Monday Night Football audiences, an estimated 12 million more were watching on television.     As Rica Madrid and John Nicholson...

Come, learn and share your history

Seven hundred were way more guests than Maryland State Archives director of outreach Emily Oland Squires planned for at last year’s innaugural Family History ­Festival.     “I would have been happy if we had more people than staff,” she told Bay Weekly in 11th-hour planning for the second festival.     No matter how many people come to the Archives, in Annapolis, Saturday, November 7, she and Archives staff will have room. Especially for you...

Know where your oyster comes from — and howOysters in Season

Oysters are Maryland’s catch of the season. Oystermen and women are tonging, diving and dredging for Crassostrea virginica in a season that runs October 1 through March 31.     Last year saw 393,588 bushels harvested with a dockside value of $17.3 million. “The second highest total in at least 15 years due to healthy oyster reproduction in 2010 and 2012,” according to DNR Secretary Mark Belton.     Nowadays, however, the...

Letters home from a new soldier, drafted to fight World War I

November 11 brings us once more to Veterans Day, our nation’s day of remembrance of all our veterans, living and dead. The 96-year-old commemoration began as Armistice Day, celebrating the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, when soldiers of the Allied Forces and of Germany, the enemy, laid down their weapons.     The war to end all wars began in Europe on July 28, 1914. The United States joined the conflict as an Associated Power on April 6, 1917, promptly...