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Photographer Jay Fleming documents life on — and in — the water

Mack the Lab is Maryland’s chief apiary sniffer

High school band tops in Maryland

Clear skies forecast for this weekend’s Chesapeake Bay Blues Festival

Jeanne Kelly’s Encore Chorale proves music can reverse aging

Your paper is hand-delivered each week by a team of dedicated drivers

All the wonderful writing, beautiful cover pages, pleasing layouts and on-time printing wouldn’t mean a thing without the group of six stalwart delivery drivers who get Bay Weekly to your favorite pick-up point each Thursday. Neither rain, nor snow, nor wind, nor blinding early morning sunshine will keep these mighty drivers from their appointed rounds.     You may never see them, so we bring them to you, in celebration of all the drivers who — with this paper...

Species depend on your yard and you

What if your backyard were the last place for wildlife to live? What if now were your last chance to help?     It is, and it is.     So says Doug Tallamy, the University of Delaware entomology professor, who comes to Bowie for Earth Day to explain why.     “He has identified an environmental storm front the likes of Silent Spring,” says Elmer Dengler of the Bowie-Crofton Garden Club, a sponsor of Tallamy’s April 21 visit....

That’s the goal of Pirate’s Cove’s Pigs & Pearls Fundraiser to benefit the West & Rhode Riverkeeper

They say it was a hungry man who was the first to eat an oyster, but I disagree. I say it was a smart man, one who figured out how to set a bunch of oysters on a flat rock by a fire, cover them over with wet leaves and let them steam until they popped open, then slurped down all those succulent bits of salty goodness. Come to think of it, that was probably one smart woman who figured that out.     There were always a lot of smart men and women feasting on oysters around the West...

Atlantic ribbed and hooked mussels are Chesapeake’s Brita filter

Mussels are more than a seafood dish in buttery broth. Unlike those delectable mussels, our Chesapeake Bay mussels are small and tough. Our two native species, the Atlantic ribbed mussel and the hooked mussel, serve environment rather than appetite. Both are believed to be key indicator species of the health of the Bay.     These filter feeders have a leg up on oysters. Due to their smaller size, they can catch the smaller plankton Picoplankton.     In doing that...

Take another guess or two

“What are those things?” a friend inquired.     The photos Shady Sider Kate King posted after she and son Caleb explored Calvert County’s Matoaka Beach showed a row of large concrete rings lined up on the shore.     “Alien spaceship remains,” King replied.     Are they really?     Steve Kullen of the Calvert County Department of Community Planning pulled back the curtain on this mystery.  ...

SOFO business group to transform Annapolis Middle School fence from sad to glad

Thousands of commuters each day slog their way along Forest Drive, the busy Annapolis thoroughfare running from the southwest edge of the city to the Eastport Peninsula.     The South Forest Drive Business Association, SOFO as the coalition of local businesses calls itself, wants to give those drivers something to look at, beginning with a 500-foot rusty and battered chain-link fence topped with barbed-wire midway along the road at Annapolis Middle School.     ...

Just how different is now from then?

When you take time to count, thoughts start tickling your brain.     That sequence — 22-23-24 — which I hadn’t noticed until I wrote it down, could start its own numerological train of thought.     Here’s another number: 1,219. That’s how many editions of Bay Weekly we will have made in the 24 years since we published Vol. 1 No. 1 on Earth Day 23, April 22, 1993.     What do all those issue amount to? Where did all...

Leo James knows better than most what’s swimming down there

In gauging the chances of a successful fishing season, I have learned to distrust the forecasting of state and conservation officials as fraught with politics and self-interest. Worse, my own guesses have proven wrong so often that I’ve learned to stop making them. There has been, however, one source I rely on year after year.     I’ve come to think of this fellow with his thick mane of white hair as the Oracle of Mill Creek.     Leo James has again...

Bloom is the best thing to come out of D.C in a long time

The demand for organically grown food continues to increase. Because chemical fertilizers cannot be used in its production, growers must depend on natural sources for nutrients, such as animal manures, compost and green manure crops. The demand for compost is so great that it exceeds the supply.     The problem may soon be solved by recent developments in processing biosolids.     Biosolids are the solid materials derived from wastewater processing facilities,...

Silly romance mars an important subject

In the mountain villages of Turkey, Mikael Boghosian (Oscar Isaac: X-Men: Apocalypse) is an apothecary with dreams of earning a medical degree. Financing his studies with the dowry from an arranged marriage, he promises to return to his fiancée in two years as a doctor.     In Constantinople, he lives with his uncle, a wealthy merchant. The life of luxury and the family nanny, Ana (Charlotte Le Bon: Realive) distract him from his classes. Beautiful, free spirited and worldly,...