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Nextival promises the next level in good times

Marvel offers a brief break from universe-destroying supervillains in this light flick
 

A 2018 high school grad explains how America vanquished its most numerous bird

Promising Playwright’s work addresses the terror about being unemployed and losing one’s place in this world

Your growing plants get hungry, too, as they start to produce
 

It has left our lives filled with holes
 

Far ahead of schedule, this summer’s bumper crop is shocking the system

This is the true story about all of us who unwittingly, faithfully and dutifully went to our garden centers and bought tomato plants in mid-April. In this region, we’re cautioned not to plant before May 1. That was then. This is now, 2010, after the coldest, snowiest winter on record. Warm weather swept through our area in early May and upended that theory; holes were dug, plants submerged, things happened. Best-looking tomato plants I’ve ever seen. Thanks in part to the Bay...
  The gibbous moon waxes through southern skies this week, becoming full on the 25th. July’s full moon is known as the Hay Moon or the Thunder Moon. Rising at dusk and setting at dawn, the full moon dominates the sky this week, blotting out all but the brightest planets and stars. As the sun sets in the northwest before 8:25 this week, the first light to appear is the evening star Venus, 20 degrees above the western horizon. As dusk gives way to darkness, Venus is joined by ruddy...
Fish Are Biting Rockfish are continuing to be caught trolling small bucktails and soft shad as well as by live-lining Norfolk spot. The bite is not quite as reliable as it was before the heat wave, but good stripers are still being caught during the right phase of the tide. Spot in the mid-Bay are getting bigger, with good catches of eating-sized fish becoming more common. A larger variety of croaker have shown up as well, with some 18-inchers reported. White perch are pursuing the small...
  Some people collect wine the way that others collect records or baseball cards. This weekend, at the fifth annual International Great Grapes! Wine, Arts & Food Festival, the vinophiles among you get to add to your collection. “The festival is an inexpensive way to taste hundreds of wines right in your own backyard,” said Greg Nivens, president of The Trigger Agency, the event’s promoter in partnership with Mill’s Fine Wine and Spirits of Annapolis. “It...
  Dear Bay Gardener We planted Roma’s, Big Boys and Beefsteaks, all Burpees. Garden is in full sun until late afternoon. I get a soil test done each year from Penn State. In addition, I added about four bags of manure when I tilled. When we planted, we used a mix of mostly dirt with a bit of manure and peat moss. I added the soil recommendation of 10-10-10, and just about two weeks ago I added maybe a tablespoon and a half in a two-foot circle around the plants. Up until one week ago...
  Dear Bay Weekly:   Thanks for the heads up about the coming electoral season in your Letter from the Editor, “Signs of the Times” [July 15]. I’ve enjoyed the dueling yard signs in my neighborhood over the years during election time, both as spectator and participant.   In my days of working for Alaskan politicians, trinket giveaways were also part of campaigning. Sewing kits, playing cards, key chains and berry buckets — all sporting the candidates...
Dear Bay Weekly: What a beautiful story “Hearing Hope in the Melody” [July 15]. The musicians Carolyn Surrick, Sue Richards and Ginger Hildebrand deserve special recognition for their devotion to the wounded GI’s. Reading their story brought a tear to my tired old GI eyes (Vietnam).  Thank you for sharing. This article should be printed by the national media. Also, Diana Beechener did a great job telling their story. Job well done, Bay Weekly.    –Jerry...
  Bill Burton wanted a windmill in his backyard. Not as decoration, and certainly not to chase away birds, for Bill was their dedicated friend. No, he wanted windmills because he believed our future depends on them as one no-longer optional choice we must make to save our planet. “Should we persist in ignoring global warming, there’s more than a good chance that future generations won’t be able to make up for time lost.” Burton wrote those words in his Earth Day...
  Botanical gardens have always had difficulty keeping plant viruses out of their orchid collections. While working at the U.S. Botanical Garden in Washington, D.C., Carol Allen often noticed small indentations or notches on the aerial roots of orchids in the conservatory. One evening, she saw cockroaches crawling over the roots. Could they be the culprits spreading viruses between contaminated plants and newly arrived virus-free plants? Always before, virus transmission between plants had...

Week 18: He — or She — Is a Big Baby

Junior is getting really big. He’s over half the size of his mother now, and is working his father hard to satisfy his ever-increasing appetite for fish, which his mother still feeds him one bite at a time. He was awkwardly stretching his wings out the other day; it won’t be long now before his mother will have him flapping his wings to develop his flight muscles. In case you wondered, even in hot weather, ospreys don’t need to drink water. They get enough from the fresh fish...