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Gov. Hogan gearing up for Bay battle

 

     We soon may see how much clout GOP Gov. Larry Hogan has in Washington Republican circles.      Last week, the Democratic-run U.S. House upped to $85 million next year’s allocation for the Chesapeake Bay Program.      As we know, the Trump administration wants to gut the Bay program and other watershed restorations around the country. The White House said okay to about $7 million, but no more.

Potomac gives up 376,933 pounds

 

     Giant tires, propane gas tanks and shopping carts bogged down with mud.     Trash-picking volunteers found this trash and more in the littered waters of the Potomac River at the 31st annual Watershed Cleanup. The Alice Ferguson Foundation initiative sent out 9,745 volunteers between mid-March and late-May. They scooped 376,933 pounds of trash into garbage bags.

For 457 Hondurans, Prince Frederick Rotary’s simple solution is salvation

 

      “Water is the driving force of all nature,” Leonardo da Vinci said.       Yet 663 million of us do not have access to safe, clean water, according to thirstproject.org.      In Honduras, 457 people now have access to water that is safe to drink, cook with and bathe in, thanks to a partnership between two Rotary Clubs, Prince Frederick and La Paz, Honduras.

$4,000 to Charting Careers Students

 

     Charting Careers not only mentors underserved Annapolis young people. It also awards scholarships to help them reach their goals. In this its inaugural year as an independent program, it invested close to $4,000 in local teens.

Selling magic for the Fourth

 

    For up to 12 hours, even on the hottest and rainiest days, Mary Larichiuta drifts around TNT Fireworks’ shady tent off Mayo Road in Edgewater. Customers trickle in, leaving her with lots of free time to manage the fireworks under the tent.      She doesn’t get paid commission, just an hourly wage, but the “low-stress” job fills in time between summer and teaching at her middle school.

Thunderstorms on the Bay

 

      Our Chesapeake Bay is not among the world’s most dangerous places to sail. It is not the Somali coast or Cape Horn. But in an instant, a peaceful outing can confirm the old saying that sailing is often hours of boredom punctuated by moments of terror.

Carnivorous plants latest Maryland transplant

     Nearly 150 years ago, Charles Darwin wrote a book about carnivorous plants that included sketches of the tentacles they use to trap insects.       That evolution has taken a while to reach us. Now, climate change is the likely culprit. The first insect-eating plant has been discovered on the Eastern Shore near Nassawango Creek in Worcester County.
Connect History to Life Racial justice essay contest 

Maryland testing digital license plates

      Will the Maryland Department of Transportation unscrew license-plate tradition? Digital plates that resemble electronic tablets are now in a two-year trial run on 20 test vehicles.      Maryland is one of the first states on the East Coast to enter the pilot program. Arizona, California and Michigan already allow the technology.

We’re meeting our reduction goals, Bay Foundation says

     Of the six Bay states, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia produce roughly 90 percent of the pollution.     To control Bay pollution, the EPA Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint of 2010 sets limits for nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment. By 2025, all Bay jurisdictions must have in place the practices and policies necessary to meet the Bay’s pollution limits.