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Pop-Up Cleaning Event Aims to Bring Neighbors Together and Protect Waterways

State is home to more sites than any other in the nation

Calvert student named honoree
Three ways to get outside before spring

Open them up and dream of spring

     Seed catalogs used to come in the mail after the holidays. Not anymore. This year the inundation started around Thanksgiving. After gardening for more than 40 years, I think every seed company and mail order nursery knows my address. My mailbox seems to explode with catalogs earlier every year.      But once the holidays are over, they’re a welcome reminder that spring is coming in not so many weeks.       One of my favorite catalogs is...

It’s been good to know you

     We are none of us new to shutting doors behind us. As I write this letter, I am on the open side of the door. Once I finish it, I shut the door on Bay Weekly’s long chapter of my life. For I have saved this letter to you as the last thing I will write as editor of Bay Weekly. I’ll not be able to open that door again except through memory. Fond as I am of memory, it is — another truth you and I both know — only a substitute for the real thing.  ...

I grew up alongside you

     Build it and they will come. That’s what we said — my mother Sandra Martin, my stepfather Bill Lambrecht and myself — back in these same end-of-the-year days in 1992, 27 years ago. If it worked for Kevin Costner, it would work for a family of journalists wanting to start their own free community newspaper.       So we built it, and come they did, writers, readers, advertisers, friends, loved-ones for the better part of three decades....
We had our first in 1993; 2020 begins another
      The year was 1993, and change was afoot. Sandra Olivetti Martin had finished managing a weekly in Washington and had turned to freelancing. Alex Knoll had earned his M.S. in journalism from the University of Illinois and joined us in Chesapeake Country. I was just off the campaign trail after covering the winning election of Bill Clinton.       There was hope in the air (unrelated to Clinton talking all the time about Hope, Arkansas, where he was born.)...
I never could get away from Bay Weekly
      “Why don’t you come intern at Bay Weekly?” editor Sandra Martin said from behind her instructor’s desk at University College, where she taught editing to me and a classroom of students. It seemed an innocent enough suggestion to this then-20-something-year-old in search of a career back in the mid-1990s.       “It’ll be a stepping stone,” Martin said. With visions of The Washington Post, Baltimore Sun and glossy...

And trust

     Many analogies come to mind when processing the end of Bay Weekly Part 1 — the first 27 years. How do you define letting go of your baby when it is a business? Emotions run from grief to excitement and relief.      I haven’t been part of the team since the beginning, but I did get swept up in the early years — 1996 to be exact — when I met and subsequently married co-owner Alex Knoll. Lately, I have sat on the sidelines watching him...

I was a young writer in adventureland

     I came to Bay Weekly in 2004, early in my career, following a desire to write and see my words published. After a summer internship, I worked on staff as a senior writer and assistant editor, and for four years, contributing to one of the most thoughtful, interesting, well-written local publications I’d known.       From that summer internship, I knew I actually loved writing when afternoons flew by as I typed away at my desk, shaping my stories and...

Work for a newspaper

      Do you know how to hide crematorium ashes when training a cadaver dog? Do you know how to bake a Smith Island cake? Do you know where to go for the best nativity play in Calvert County?       I do, and it’s all thanks to Bay Weekly.        I was just supposed to write the calendar.  That was the job I signed up for when I met with Sandra Martin in a small Deale office. Five days a week, writing up local events and organizing...

We’ve been a united group

      It’s been one of my best career times working for Bay Weekly over the past eight years. Nearly all work and writing of my previous endeavors had been solo performances. In this position, I have known what it is to work with a united group. That was a gratifying experience. To work in a congenial, cheerful group with such exacting goals and far-sighted ideals was a pleasure!       Editor Sandra Martin and her son Alex Knoll were the most empathetic...
 
My job and my family are both parts of me, and at Bay Weekly each got equal respect and compassion
      Bay Weekly has a long wooden table where we all gather round to eat lunch together nearly every day. We celebrate birthdays and special occasions with cakes and pies. We tell our stories that can only be shared in person. That table has witnessed a lot of milestone moments for our office. Back in the fall, though, it witnessed our most heartbreaking meeting.        My stomach lurched that day we were told that the paper was closing at the end of 2019....