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October 2010

The candidates speak for themselves on our Bay and communities

This election is like few others we’ve seen. With so many voters fed up with the course of governing — and with so many candidates struggling to tap into this palpable anger — 2010 brings a new strain of the old throw-out-the-bums electoral fever. There’s demagoguery out there, too, in this season of discontent. So it’s hard to know who’s telling it straight and who’s trying to exploit our body politic at a vulnerable moment.  
Dear Bay Weekly: How time flies by. Nothing shows the passage of time like physical changes.  I read that the last house on Holland Island has fallen into the Bay. This was the same island we used as the stopping-off location for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation kayak trips with Don Baugh and Tom Horton. It was my first trip into the Bay, and I also wrote about my experiences Up Close and Personal for my first Bay Weekly story [Aug. 16, 2001].
  Dear Bay Weekly: This debate on the windmills [Pulling Pennies from the Air and The TALL Price of Power, Sept. 30; Correspondence, October 14; Letter from the Editor, October 21] is interesting indeed.
  Dear Bay Weekly: I would like to take the opportunity to thank the Bay Weekly for its excellent primary election issue. Nowhere else can a voter find such a comprehensive, unbiased guide to the local candidates. This election, I made a point to save all the campaign literature that arrived at my door and in my mailbox. Now that the election approaches, I have a pile six inches thick. I have to take to screening my calls every evening due to campaign calls. I am sure many voters feel as I do and just want to get it over with.

Where government is a friend, not the enemy

  The year’s political babble has the tenor of a neo-Freudian emergency room. Lots of people in obvious psychic pain are loudly blaming government — not mom or dad — for all that’s wrong in the world.

A bigger budget means louder, not scarier, thrills in this horror prequel

I don’t think of myself as a horror wimp. I’ve seen it all, and I’ll watch the sequels. That said, the first Paranormal Activity creeped me out. Days later an unexplained noise or a movement in my peripheral vision would cause me to tense and search for its demonic origins. Paranormal Activity 2 is a worthy step in the series, but it nowhere nears the original’s scare-power.

This meditative speculation on the spiritual realm is easily the quietest death-minded movie in the Cineplex this Halloween.

Three strangers are wrestling with death. Marie (Cécile De France: Mesrine: Killer Instinct), a French journalist, is revived after nearly being consumed by the Indian Ocean tsunami and emerges shaken by her brush with the afterlife. Marcus, a British schoolboy, is left rudderless when his twin brother Jason is stolen by tragedy (Frankie and George McLaren in their debut). And George (Matt Damon: Green Zone) is a genuine psychic talent who laments his burden of communing with the dead.

On one, I ask you to be the judge

Your letters are the high point of my week. Of course praise is ice cream after dinner. Of that I had a full serving in W.R. Kraus’ words from Edgewater: We very much enjoy your paper. Since we moved here in 2004, it has helped us understand the area we live in; manage our garden; and find lots of fun things to do. It also has the added benefit of not making me want to jump off the roof after reading the news!

The Parking Garden at Little Gotts Court in Annapolis is soaking up stormwater runoff and getting it back into the ground

It rained and it rained. Three inches, five inches, nine inches, 13 inches of new water fell on Annapolis. City Dock was underwater. Compromise Street was flooded. The low places in Eastport on Second Street and Chester Avenue and in West Annapolis on King George Street were flooded. Roads with the least bit of incline were sluiceways for water. Overloaded storm drains seeking new outlets made missiles of manhole covers. On September 30, 2010, a mini-Isabel was flooding Annapolis.

Superspy sages come out of retirement swinging in this snappy comic action flick.

Frank Moses (Bruce Willis: Cop Out) is a lonely guy, quietly whiling away retirement with regular phone calls to his federal pension agent, Sarah (Mary-Louise Parker: TV’s Weeds). Dimmed verve gets a jolt, though, when a hit squad comes crashing through his home in the dead of night. Suddenly he’s crisscrossing the country, fighting off a kill order and CIA hotshot William (Karl Urban: Star Trek) even while connecting with mothballed allies and assets. Together they’ll crack a few heads and break the conspiracy that would have them dead. Thus the fun ensues.