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October 2016

And what these days mean to Jews

Bay Weekly You’ve just held your first service for Beit Chaverim [bejt xAvajr\im], Calvert’s Jewish community.

You’ll enjoy the best flavor and pound out your aggression

The best sauerkraut is made from freshly harvested cabbage grown during the fall months. I make about 20 pounds of sauerkraut every two to three years and store it in canning jars.     Choose cabbages that form tight dense heads and can be uniformly shredded into pieces approximately one-eighth of an inch thin. I prefer Flat Head Dutch be­cause the tight, dense heads can easily be shredded. Heads can weigh five pounds or more.

For my youngest’s 24th, a hard-fighting false ­albacore

It has been quite a while since I heard a reel drag shriek. I had to go to Florida to hear it — not once but three times in minutes.     My youngest son, Rob, was holding the protesting rig as a powerful fish departed at speed. Harrison, my next oldest at 27, was live-lining a small pilchard farther down the pier when his reel also began to wail as line ripped off the spool.

Farewell, Joe Browder: 1938-2016

“Most of what became our woods in 1981 was a farm family’s pasture 40 years ago. We didn’t have the decades to wait for honey-scented flowers to appear again on their own timetable. We also wanted to be able to smell the wild azaleas of the Smokies and Blue Ridge, of the north Florida river forests and the Carolinas,” Joe Browder wrote in the third issue of New Bay Times, which would become Bay Weekly.

Often our best learning comes from questions rather than from answers, from wondering about seemingly small details or great mysteries …

The Bay. When said and heard that way, the words mean more than a dictionary’s definition, more than a body of water, sheltered somehow from a larger lake or sea. The Bay means that a person knows about a special place.     This awareness is a gift to the people who have it, a relationship to the place and to other people who share the knowledge. The more we learn, from the Bay and from Bay people, the more valuable the gift becomes.

Meet the World’s Most Admired Woman in her formative years

When Eleanor Roosevelt died in 1962, the widow of the 26th President, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, was called by the New York Times The World’s Most Admired Woman. The longest-serving first lady, she was also the tallest until Michelle Obama, at 5'11", met her mark. At a time when political wives were expected to be seen and not heard, she was an outspoken humanitarian, feminist, unionist and champion of racial reform.

Can a rag-tag bunch of ne'er-do-wells defeat an army of villains?

To rid himself of the Rose Creek townspeople impeding his mining operation, land baron Bartholomew Bogue (Peter Sarsgaard: Black Mass) offers an ultimatum: take the paltry sum offered — or die. To prove he’s serious, he burns the church and shoots a few men, women and children, leaving the survivors to pick up their bodies.     Thus begins the latest take on two great movies, Akira Kurosawa’s classic Seven Samurai, and John Sturges’s subsequent western classic The Magnificent Seven.

GOSHEN FARM 5th ANNUAL HARVEST PASTA DINNER

Event Date:  October 15, 2016 - 5:00pm - 7:30pm Event: 5th ANNUAL HARVEST PASTA DINNER Sponsored by: Goshen Farm Preservation Society Date: Saturday, October 15, 2016 Time: 5:00pm until 7:30pm Location: Gloria Dei! Lutheran Church, 461 College Parkway, Arnold, MD Admission: $10.00 per person, children under 10, $5.00 This family-oriented dinner will feature home-made tomato sauce prepared from organically-grown tomatoes by members of the Goshen Farm Sharing Garden, home-made meatballs in the traditional Italian style, spaghetti squash for the gluten-intolerant folks, salad, bread, side dishes, desserts, and beverages. Location Gloria Dei! Lutheran Church 461 College Parkway Arnold, MD United States See map: Google Maps