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Features (Green Living)

Can’t get your boat to a pump-out station? One will come to you

If you spend much time on your boat, it’s probably got a head. What you put into the head can’t go into the Bay. It’s against the law to pump effluent into the Bay or its tributaries or within three miles of the U.S. coastline.

To buy the right bulb, you need to be an engineer

In the electrical department of a local big box home improvement store, I couldn’t help but overhear a woman mumbling, “When did things become so complicated?” I drifted in the other direction to avoid the drama.

From juice pouches to chip bags, recycling makes cents

    With school starting, kids will be packing their lunches, gobbling individual snacks and drinks.
    Ziploc sandwich bags, Capri Sun juice pouches, chip bags and the plastic wrap that protects a homemade cookie will all be thrown away after every lunch, destined to release carbon emissions in a landfill.

By paying Flush Tax, we’re all helping

However you play it, natural gas export is a high stakes game

     The biggest development proposed in Southern Maryland history looks much like a high-stakes game, with scenic Cove Point at the center of the board. At stake are millions of dollars in tax revenue, thousands of new jobs — and a quiet way of life Calvert County residents hope to preserve.

Unity Gardens spreads the green

Anne Arundel County blooms with the help of Unity Gardens twice a year. This non-profit organization raises money to helps community groups with twice-yearly grants to green their spaces. The new cycle to apply for grants up to $1,000 runs from July 1 through August 31. So act now or wait until January.

Good earth still open for gardeners

On a farm in St. Margaret’s, land that had been in sod has sprouted raised beds for a new community garden. The one-half-acre space gets full sun, has good fencing to keep out the deer and plenty of water. Thanks to the dedication of the farmers and members of Grow Annapolis, those with shade-bound yards now have a place to go — not just to raise food, but also to make new friends....

Tattered sneakers tell a river’s story. Retired state senator Bernie Fowler tells his.
This Sunday, June 8, Bernie Fowler will tie on his white sneakers to wade into the Patuxent River. Well-wishers, family and friends, school kids, politicians and reporters will join him, linking hands in a human chain, striding into the water until they can no longer see their shoes. Then, if history is a guide, Steny Hoyer — the second-ranking Democrat in the U.S....
One community takes a big drop out of the Bay’s bucket
Rain barrels can help the citizens of the old-fashioned Bay village of Galesville prove that if we all do a little, we can do a lot. That’s the message five candidates of the Anne Arundel Watershed Stewards Academy are using this summer to promote their graduation project: adding 55 new rain barrels to the town household by household.

Will our trash be ­treasure in 3,000 years?
You’re living on top of history, your story standing on others before it. If you live on the water, that history could be middens.
Chesapeake Country is dotted with thousands of the old refuse heaps built up of trash left behind by pre-Europeans. Our middens are mostly eastern oyster shells — plus tons of bones, shells, pottery shards and chipped stone that survived thousands of years.