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Agricultural program grows at Phoenix Academy

Next time you cruise down Cedar Park Road in Annapolis during school hours, you may well do a double-take as you pass the field next to Phoenix Academy. You’re likely to see rabbits munching greens in a sturdily built hutch, hear nanny goats bleating or glimpse teens carefully weeding a row of curly-leafed kale. Three years after a Curriculum for Agricultural Science Education was launched at this K-12 Anne Arundel County public school, there’s plenty of evidence that impressive hands-on learning is going on both within and outside the school walls.

They’re out to trap cast-off ­monofilament line

Girl Scouts Noel Pockey and Ashley Whicher are working to save the Bay from used fishing line.     When anglers toss line torn from their reel, the unbreakable and almost invisible plastic monofilament a death warrant to critters. The line ensnares animals, birds and fish, trapping the life out of them. The entangled fishing line continues its havoc, putting swimmers and boat propellers at risk — until it finally degrades 500 years later.

Local artist takes you 15,000 feet for this Commissioning Week highlight

Never in real life will you see the Blue Angels as Joe Barsin captures them in his iconic graphic on Bay Weekly’s cover. For the Annapolis artist’s eye encapsulates the whole of the U.S. Naval Academy’s Commissioning Week in a single soaring moment.

As the South Riverkeeper, I am ­helping to make the river healthy for my children and yours

Not too long ago, I was working in consumer-protection litigation. After law school, I took a job suing banks and shady lenders on behalf of consumers. That wasn’t where I really wanted to be.     In law school at the University of Maryland, I had earned a certificate of concentration in environmental law. When I graduated in 2010, environmental law jobs weren’t as plentiful as I had hoped. So I sued banks instead.

Teens compete in the Annapolis Junior Keelboat Regatta

The future of competitive sailboat racing is in good hands, judging from the teenage competitors in the Annapolis Junior Keelboat Regatta.     “It’s really exciting to move up to the keelboats,” said Kate Riley, 16, a sophomore at Severna Park High and the only female skipper among the seven crews racing. “We didn’t win, but we got better and better and ­finished second in the last race.”

Having fun, making a difference and driving the pump-out boat
 

Almost a year ago, the West/Rhode Riverkeeper completed a living shoreline project at the end of the Camp Letts peninsula on the Rhode River. Over the past few decades, the land had been eroding from storms, boat wake and sea level rise. Hundred-year-old trees were toppling over a sandy bluff, and the silt made the water look like a soy latte.

STEM program combines ­engineering and fun

Hallie Zlokovitz dips her fingers into a tub of sticky, greasy toilet ring wax and stuffs it into what looks like a film container. At the next table, Emily Ernst has pushed her sleeves up above her colorful bracelets so that she doesn’t get the wax on them. Kathryn Willhite takes sandpaper to the motors that power her Sea-3P0 model.

Churches on a mission to save the Bay

Yes, we’ll gather at the river, The beautiful, the beautiful river; Gather with the saints at the river That flows by the throne of God. –Hymn by Robert Lowry  

The Perennial Diva Stephanie Cohen talks garden-planning

Bay Weekly    What can we do for living color to hurry winter away? Stephanie Cohen    Think containers. Buy a small shrub that’s too dinky for the garden, put it in a frost-free container you can enjoy and tend near the house. When it outgrows the container, you can put it in the ground. I had a nice little dwarf fir tree that I was afraid deer would eat that sat in a container near my house for five years. Now it’s planted and growing.

December 27, 1937, is the day that equality came to Calvert County, thanks to school teacher Harriet ­Elizabeth Brown

Harriet Elizabeth Brown was a young woman of 30 when she challenged separate salary scales for black teachers. The year was 1937.     The Calvert County teacher’s attorney, Thurgood Marshall, was 29 when he represented her in the first Brown vs. Board of Education lawsuit. Together they laid the foundation for the Maryland Teachers Pay Equalization Law.     In 1939, federal courts ruled that determining the salaries of white and colored teachers solely on account of race or color was unlawful discrimination.