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Retired professor follows Maryland hero from Port Tobacco to Canada

        Uncle Tom lived many lives.            To the thousands of mid-19th-century readers of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s best-selling novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin, he was a heroic slave, his cabin home was heralded as a symbol of self-sacrifice. Yet to 20th century black Americans, his name lived as a symbol of subservience.

Fred Tutman, the only African ­American ­Riverkeeper on the job

       Waterkeeping has become a regular part of environmental conservation in Chesapeake Country, where 18 riverkeepers protect their local waters from the Atlantic at Assateague to the Shenandoah in the Appalachians, from the James at the mouth of the Bay to the Middle Susquehanna at its source.       In that commitment, we’re in good company. From New York’s Hudson River, where riverkeeping began, the movement has spread across the nation, giving us some 250 waterkeepers.

Statues of Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass to stand in Maryland State House

      The intersection of public art and politics is a hard one to negotiate. Lots of traffic — history, symbolism, myth, ideals, politics and budgets — is moving in different directions.

Calvert Library writes local history

       In Calvert County, the public library has gone beyond collecting books to creating them. For Women’s History Month last March, the library sponsored Inspiring Black Women of Calvert County. This year men take the stage as subjects of a new local history book, Inspiring African American Men of Calvert County.

Community service group asks your help

      The Deale Elks Lodge has been a cornerstone in Southern Anne Arundel County for 44 years. Known for its support, generosity and general do-goodery, the fraternal organization makes regular donations to Shady Side Elementary, Deale Elementary and the South County Youth Association. It hosts fundraising events for members and organizations throughout the community, provides a meeting place for Boy Scouts and other citizens’ groups and joins with other organizations and businesses in South County to lend a hand when needed. 
Sotterley Plantation memorialized as UNESCO Slave Route Project Site
for role in Middle Passage 
       Historic Sotterley Plantation, along the Patuxent River in Southern Maryland is the 94-acre site of bountiful colonial revival gardens, music and wine festivals, picturesque weddings, an organic farm, special events and of course, tours of the historic 18th-cen­tury manor house and grounds.
Methuselah and Mary Pumphrey lived history
       Methuselah Pumphrey lived to be 96, writing along the way another chapter in Chesapeake Country’s African American history. The history he made was not earth-shattering. He didn’t walk to the North Pole, like Marylander Matthew Henson, or gain equal pay for Maryland black teachers and then desegregate the nation’s schools like Thurgood Marshall.        Pumphrey’s was the kind of life most of us live: infinitely precious on a small scale.

Tinder lights the fire

      Love is tricky. The adage goes, you never know where you’ll find it. Maybe it’s out on a dock by the Bay or under the awnings of a local coffee shop. For me, love was where I’d least expected to find it: Tinder.

Army combat veteran uses humor to talk about a difficult subject and to generate awareness of how vets don’t want to be treated differently

     It’s a packed house and the crowd is warmed up as the emcee introduces the next comic at D.C.’s celebrated Comedy Improv.      “Please put your hands together for Adam Keys, ladies and gentlemen!” Cheers and applause.      As Keys climbs the stairs below stage left, the audience registers something different about him. Is it his rocking gait? His height? His outfit, maybe?

Discovering the place and the truth behind the legend

      From 19th century art to 20th century children’s books to the Disney animated movie to the sultry song Fever, the forbidden love story of Pocahantas and John Smith is embedded in American romantic legend.        The narrative changes depending on who is telling it: Europeans or Native Americans. For the real story is very different from the myth.