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Third World artisans to Davidsonville Church Women to survivors of domestic violence

       To spread Christmas cheer while making a positive impact globally and locally, the women of Davidsonville United Methodist Church teamed with Ten Thousand Villages for the church’s third annual Alternative Christmas Market. The Pennsylvania-based non-profit helps artisans in developing countries sell their crafts world-wide.

Mary Kilbourne: 1936-2019

     Ask Mary Kilbourne’s friends and former students what they remember about her, you’ll hear about banding birds, seining a pond to find water scorpions, the latest Envirothon or leading Cub Scouts on a trek through the woods — and underlying it all her passion for wildlife, nature and the earth. She was a naturalist and an enthusiastic protector of local rivers and natural spaces, testifying against development of dwindling wooded spaces.

Holiday shop now open at Bunting Online Auctions

      Like the Ireland boys you read about last week [Teens Donate 4-H Hog to Charity:  http://www.bayweekly.com/node/51320 ], more Chesapeake Country kids are using what’s close at hand to lend a helping hand.
A Bay Weekly conversation with Allison Tracy of Smithsonian ­Environmental Research Center
     Oysters are a victim in the climate crisis, by most accounts, and ours in Chesapeake Bay waters are feeling it like their bivalve brethren elsewhere.      West Coast oysters are hurting from changing ocean chemistry. In New Orleans’ French Quarter, eateries are scrambling to live up to their reputations as Gulf of Mexico oysters die, smothered by the billions of gallons of Midwestern freshwater rolling down the Mississippi River.
Tour the county from Hole in the Barn Door to Mariner's Compass
     Calvert County’s mysterious new trail is not hidden, but you need a map or a guide to find and follow its course. Along the trail in plain sight are 17 wooden-framed images each with a design painted in an array of color combinations. Each has its own designation, like, Mariner’s Compass, Sawtooth Star or Farmer’s Daughter. The designs are so different that, despite being mostly fashioned on 8-by-8 or 4-by-4-foot frames, they don’t seem to have a central theme. 

Waging a fight against Japanese stiltgrass

    Microstegium vimineum. It’s a mouthful to say. A more common name for this uninvited guest to the Bay region’s forest floors is Japanese stiltgrass. On the first day of November, a cool crisp fall day, three nature-lovers — including myself — inspected a local infestation of the grass in the Severn Run Natural Environmental Area in Gambrills.

Pig earns $7,000 for Hospice

      Teen brothers TJ and Colby Ireland devised an appetizing way to give thanks to a Chesapeake Country charity.          They raised a hog for the 4-H livestock auction at the Calvert County Fair. Instead of keeping the money, the Irelands donated it to Calvert Hospice.          The brothers, ages 16 and 14, wanted to help hospice because of the help it had given to their family.

Low Country cuisine in ­Chesapeake Country

     Thanksgiving is by tradition a gathering of people for a feast that shares their cultures.       If you come from Daufuskie (say Daw-Fo-skee) Island, as Shady Sider Emily Bryant does, you’d be sharing Gullah culture in such Low Country dishes as Daufuskie deviled crabs and Gullah stew.

Odes to family, comfort

     At a moment of fraying connections, of nose-in-the-phone solitude and epidemic loneliness, Chesapeake Country offers one enduring remedy — the oyster.     Oysters are a great foodstuff of Maryland history and a treasure of our waters. But they’re also sinew in what binds families over generations, proved in the winner’s circle of the Annual National Oyster Cook-Off, part of Rotary Club of Lexington Park’s 53rd U.S. Oyster Festival in St. Mary’s County last month.

At 99 years, he’s made more history than he can remember

      It’s another gathering of the family to whom Emil Saroch has devoted his life since the death of his wife Patricia on Christmas Day 2004.       They seem to get larger every year. It started with him and his wife. Then the four kids came, then their spouses, then eight grandkids and two great-grandkids over the years. Many midshipmen, as well, have found the Sarochs’ home a welcome port and respite during breaks from the rigorous regimen at school at the Naval Academy.