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Things

Winter Salt Watch monitors where the sodium goes

     The first snow has come. That means snow days, hot cocoa and hunkering down. It also means road salt — and lots of it.       Before the storms, the State Highway Administration preps the roads with salt brine.      “As for how much salt we’ll use this year, we have no idea,” Charlie Gischlar said. “That’s up to Mother Nature.”

Art Things’ new owner promises to continue the tradition local artists have come to rely on

      Talk about customer satisfaction. Shopper Skye Vasquez liked Art Things so much she bought the store.       That’s good news for the artists, dabblers and dreamers who can keep up the half-century habit of browsing and buying at Annapolis’ hardware store for art.

Annapolis student’s song proves Nothing Is Impossible

      What’s a bored second-grader to do early in the morning before heading off to school? Write a story that becomes a podcast and then a track on an album, of course.        At least that’s how the story goes behind the song What the World Was Called Before Us, the creation of Windsor Farm Elementary student Liam Heist.

People and groups making a better world

“No matter what people tell you, words and ideas can change the world.” –Robin Williams  
Building skills to open new worlds
       There is much to be thankful for on my second Thanksgiving in Armenia.     Emilia is studying at Cambridge University, sent on her way with support from Chesapeake Country. One of Armenia’s brightest and best, she is one of only 12 students from all over the world offered the chance to study veterinary medicine at the world’s oldest university this year.
Donors join a raffle for a basket of goodies 
       AFC Urgent Care’s doors remain open for food donations until the end of November.         “This is the first year we’ve done something like this,” said Ginni Morani, owner of AFC Urgent Care. “Everyone wanted to get involved with a local pantry for the holiday.”

Prayers and a reflection for the feast 

     Native peoples have lived in symbiotic harmony for many generations with the North American continent. Learning its treasures and confronting its challenges they have lived on this land. They are hunters, gatherers, farmers, warriors, artisans, and they live in loving families based on organized tribal groups. These are honorable, sharing friends. Let us recognize these indigenous peoples and their diversity.
Climate stewards take aim at ­herbicides, tout healthy soils 
      It takes good soil for plants to grow healthy and vibrant. It takes brave souls to push for better legislation to make that happen.      Last year, environmentalists and organic farmers scored a win when the Maryland Legislature passed the Healthy Soils Program and Gov. Larry Hogan signed the bill. The program works to sequester the global-warming bad guy, carbon, in Maryland soil while increasing its biological activity.

Can you find this Star of David?

    Here’s a trivia question for you. What is the only United States government building with a Star of David on the front? Clue: it’s in Annapolis on the grounds of the United States Naval Academy.      Before 2005, Jewish naval midshipmen were marched to a local synagogue for services. That trek became unnecessary when the Commodore Uriah P. Levy Center and Jewish Chapel was completed — with a ­Jewish star on its front.

Follow the Oregon Trail to track this noble fir

     For 49 years, the Christmas tree that glitters from the lawn of the U.S. Capitol has been cut from a different state.       This year’s Capitol Christmas Tree is, for the first time, a noble fir. The enormous 80-foot fir was cut on November 2 from the Willamette National Forest in Oregon. The 35-year-old tree stood at an elevation of 3,500 feet.